Everything you need to know about Gen Z and Millennial research and marketing, at your fingertips.

The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “It may sound silly, but the person I look to for new trends is Chrissy Teigen. When she's not posting hilarious tweets about politics, she's sharing some amazing looking food or recipe she's trying out.”

—Male, 24, WV

To win over wealthy Chinese Millennials, Victoria’s Secret is upping its sophistication factor. Shortly after a stumble involving dragon-themed lingerie Chinese consumers deemed tacky, the retailer’s new Shanghai location has opened to portray a more “high-end image.” The store features designer lingerie and a luxury “Angel Suite” to try on pieces in an “intimate and private setting.” While consumers in the U.S. have a specific idea of Victoria’s Secret after years of marketing, “Chinese consumers without much previous knowledge are more open to its new ideas,” and more willing to try new trends from the brand.
(Jing Daily

Taco Bell is getting healthier, but don’t expect them to tell you about it. Under the direction of a dietician, the restaurant has been undergoing a quiet health revamp, “taking out all artificial ingredients, switching to cage-free eggs, and offering lighter (but still delicious) options.” Because calling themselves a “health halo” wouldn’t be “authentic” or “real”, they’re not making a big deal of the changes; instead simply providing healthier options in addition to their regular menu for those who prefer them. The changes come at a time when Millennials are “healthifying” fast food, but their relationship with healthy eating is a complicated one. (INSIDER)  

Suave’s latest campaign duped influencers into believing they were a luxury hair care product. After learning that 92% of Millennial women would buy a lower-priced hair product as long as quality is not sacrificed, the brand put their product in sleek packaging under the name Evaus, added a premium price tag, and sent it over to micro-influencers to try out. As predicted, the influencers praised the product’s quality and style, and were surprised to learn the truth. The brand hopes the spot will change the “pre-conceived notions” Millennials have about value products, but we (along with others) wonder if maybe keeping the design upgrade would be a better tactic. (Fast Company

U.K. Millennials are turning to Google for financial advice. According to a study by Zurich UK, 15% of 18-34-year-olds favor search engines over financial advisors, compared to only 3% of 35-44-year-olds. When asked why they don’t prefer to consult a professional, 37% feel they don’t earn enough to do so, about 25% feel they’re too young, and about 20% feel confident enough in their abilities to figure it out on their own. However, with over half stating that lack of savings is preventing them from achieving life goals, financial advisors may be a much-needed resource for the group. (Peer-to-Peer Finance News)

The toy industry continues to boom, but Toys R Us is struggling to keep up. The company recently reported a loss of $36 million, citing the “cultural shift” fueled by apps for decreasing their video games and electronics sales, and competitors’ “discounting spree[s]” over the holidays as reasons for the drop. To combat the loss, they plan to overhaul stores with more “shop-in-shop” experiences—like American Girl—and hold in-store events. They also plan to take advantage of “major licensing programs” from big films being released this year. (Washington Post)

Quote of the Day: “I follow movie critics/sites on Twitter - this is the best way to find out latest news and upcoming films.”—Male, 23, AL

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