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Juicy Couture, True Religion, and Ed Hardy are (still) making a comeback—thanks to their digital-first approach and collabs.

Dec 15 2021

Juicy Couture, True Religion, and Ed Hardy are (still) making a comeback—thanks to their digital-first approach and collabs. We’ve seen a resurgence of all things Y2K this year, from Kim Kardashian West and Paris Hilton bringing velour tracksuits back to “kiddie” jewelry. But exactly how are 2000s-era brands benefiting from this fashion boom? Juicy Couture is winning by staying true to its velour tracksuit-roots and has relaunched its ecommerce site to become “Buy Now, Pay Later” (BNPL)-friendly while helping consumers “really experience the brand” in the new (digital) space; True Religion is listening to its audience by lowering the price tag of its jeans from $250 to (a more affordable) $149; and Ed Hardy—known for its trucker hats and tattoo-inspired graphic t-shirts—is leaning into user-generated social content and TikTok, while bringing its tattoo-infused imagery to new product categories. Juicy Couture is also using the Tapcart app to mix streetwear tactics with mainstream fashion via exclusive drop collections (the brand’s OG Big Bling velour hoodie in rose pink sold out within a day). As the shopping world continues getting a digital upgrade, Gen Z and Millennials want to engage with brands via online activations—whether it’s shoppable livestreamsAR activations, or social commerce. (Vogue Business)