ACTIONABLE RESEARCH ON GEN Z AND MILLENNIALS
Teens Love This New Snapchat App (and Parents Don’t) On The Viral List

Teens Love This New Snapchat App (and Parents Don’t) On The Viral List

An app for asking anonymous questions is topping the App Store, Game of Thrones gives Starbucks some free press, genre-blurring Gen Z does not want manly makeup for men, and more news that riled the web this week…

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing1. A Snapchat Anonymous Question App Is Trending With Teens

An app for asking anonymous questions on Snapchat just took the App Store’s top spot, according to the BBC. Created using Snapchat’s Snap Kit tool (which was just launched last year), YOLO lets users superimpose a box asking for anonymous questions onto a picture that they can post to their Story. Then, their friends, or anyone else who has access to their account, can respond as they see fit. One teen told TechCrunch, “EVERYONE at my high school is using it right now,” showing how the app has become a surprise overnight success among Gen Z. Though it’s not too big of a surprise considering the success of previous anonymous question apps like Sarahah, Secret, and YikYak—asking for raw feedback is clearly a teen interest. So far, YOLO’s reviews are mostly positive, but many are worried that it will experience the same issue with bullying its predecessors did.

 

 

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing2. Game of Thrones Gaffe Becomes An Accidental Starbucks Promo

Game of Thrones left a to-go coffee cup in front of Daenerys during one of last episode’s scenes, and it became an accidental free marketing sensation for Starbucks. The internet was quick to spot the mistake, and add it to the list of reasons they’re disappointed with this season, reports Vox. Though the cup wasn’t actually Starbucks’, the brand was at the center of the discussion, with many joking about the barista’s spelling of “Daenerys,” let alone “Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen, the First of Her Name, Queen of the Andals and the First Men,” etc. etc. While it may not be a good look for HBO, they put on a light-hearted front, tweeting, “The latte that appeared in the episode was a mistake. #Daenerys had ordered an herbal tea.” Starbucks is living for the surprise press, tweeting, “TBH we’re surprised she didn’t order a Dragon Drink.”—plugging their Instagrammable Mango Drangonfruit Refresher.

 

 

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing3. A Makeup Brand for Men Is Not What The Genreless Generation Asked For

New makeup-for-men brand War Paint posted an ad to Twitter this week that is being thoroughly torn to pieces. While Allure points out that the name itself is problematic for appropriating Native American culture, what most people are taking issue with is the over-the-top masculine marketing approach. In the tweet in question, a video with over four million views shows a white, tattooed man with a six-pack applying make-up, and then slipping on a skull ring. Vox reports that the brand’s attempt at making makeup “manly” really just comes off as fragile masculinity, adding that makeup for men already exists—it’s called makeup. The Genreless Generation is looking for marketing that blurs gender lines, so while normalizing makeup for men is a step forward, hyper-masculine marketing is two steps back.

 

 

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing4. Wendy’s Brings Back A Menu Item Because of Viral Tweet

Wendy’s turned a tweet from Chance the Rapper into a viral campaign. USA Today reports that the music celebrity recently tweeted, “Wendy’s WILL bring back spicy nuggets at some point please please Lord let it be today.” Wendy’s then retweeted him, promising customers that they would bring back the item if the tweet garnered two million likes. They reached that benchmark within just 48 hours, the CEO tells CNBC, going on to explain that why Wendy’s is able to go viral again and again is the freedom the chain gives to their social media team, allowing them to respond in real time. However, The Takeout reports that some other celebrities, like Alyssa Milano and Amy Schumer are politicizing the viral moment, calling out Wendy’s for their lack of protection for female workers.

 

 

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing5. Links to Pass:

The internet unites to disagree with the New York Times’ opinion on Aperol Spritz’s, Guardians of the Galaxy’s Gamora puts on lipstick in a viral meme, “leaked” Detective Pikachu footage makes for good marketing, and the Met Gala inspires an over-the-top self-care meme.

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