Infographic Snapshot: Millennials and Valentine’s Day

Are Millennials telling Valentine's Day, "I'm just not that into you?" What's their relationship status, will they be celebrating, and who are they buying for? We've got the data on how Millennials are approaching the candy heart holiday. 

Valentine's Day is around the corner, and with Millennial consumers most likely making up the majority of singles who are dating, looking for love, and now starting to settle down, it’s important to understand how they view the holiday. In a recent Ypulse monthly survey, we asked about their relationship statuses, and their plans for and attitudes about February 14th. Here's some of what we found:

55% of Millennials over 18-years-old are either in a relationship or married, so the majority of older Millennials at least have a partner to, in theory, celebrate the holiday with, but that doesn't necessarily mean they embrace the 14th... 

58% of Millennials tell us that they think Valentine’s Day is overrated, and 52% say they don’t really care about the holiday. But at the same time 56% say they are celebrating it. This might explain many Millennials’ somewhat tongue-in-cheek approach to the day. As we said last year, Millennials have a tendency to turn anything they can into a joke to make it more bearable. Around this time of year, that tactic is used by the generation to take on Valentine’s Day, a holiday that can be difficult for anyone, but perhaps especially young consumers who are still figuring out their love lives. It seems even those in a relationship are not as likely to take the holiday too seriously, as is evidenced by the plethora of meme-inspired cards and trends being created by internet users from Tumblr to Twitter. But this is a generation that grew up being told to bring a Valentine for everyone in the class, and a group of consumers always looking for a reason to celebrate. Thinking it is an overrated holiday doesn’t necessarily mean they aren’t acknowledging the day, they just might have a non-traditional approach. It should also be noted that 56% of males said they don't care about Valentine's, compared to 48% of females. 

Of those planning to celebrate, the majority are planning to give a gift to a significant other, but at the same time, 47% will be spending on a gift for a family member or friend. To brands, that could be a big opportunity. Again, many of these young consumers are not taking a traditional approach, so appealing to their desire to celebrate Valentine's with non-love-interest loved ones could be a smart move. (Galentine's anyone?

The 27% who say they avoid going out in public that day could be another opportunity. Seamless is running a campaign encouraging users to stay in and eat at home, and they shouldn't be the only brand thinking of ways to cater to the group that would rather commemorate the day in the comfort of home (and pajamas). The data indicates that Millennials are willing to spend for Valentine's, but their attitudes about the holiday show that convention can be bent and brands can start thinking out of the heart shaped box. 

 

Today’s Infographic Snapshot is a portion of the data deliverable created to illuminate recent data for Gold subscribers twice a month, using stats from our most ongoing surveys of Millennials 13-32-years-old! 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


The Newsfeed

“The wedding trend I have noticed is the white wedding dress being phased out and an array of colors and styles being used.”

—Female, 32, FL

Millennials are about to receive “one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history,” according to UBS. This comes right as they reach peak earning age, making Millennials a powerful spending force—so how can Wall Street pull their purse strings? Besides transparent business practices, they’re expecting on-demand everything across all channels. Easily-navigable banking apps and mobile-first financial advice services are must-haves to impress them. (Business Insider)

Today’s teens are having safer sex, according to a CDC report. Not only are fewer teens having sex, but those that are, are more likely to be using contraceptive methods. Compared to 1988, 9% fewer 15-19-year-old females and 16% fewer males have had sex. The teen pregnancy rate in the U.S. also hit a historic low, with 99.4% of female teens who have had sex using contraception at least once, compared to 97.7% in 2002. (CBS)

Most young consumers use ad blockers, but they don’t always mind seeing ads online—as long as their “space” is respected. Defy Media and TMI Strategy found that 13-25-year-olds were open to seeing ads that are contextually relevant and informative, and don’t interrupt their experience. Anything that “clogs their feed” is off the table, but they’re not averse to all ad placements: 78% don’t consider product placement offensive, 62% follow at least one branded account, and 44% are subscribed to a branded newsletter. (Adweek)

The future of Facebook is going to be a bit more private. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that the platform’s new mission is to “give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.” Connecting with friends and family will come back to the forefront, with Groups as a “lynchpin” of this “next era” to make smaller communities and more closed-circle communication a focus, instead of the cluttered public feed. (NYMag)

Japan’s Millennials would stay at one company for life, defying the job-hopping stereotype in favor of job security. From 2001-2015, the percentage of Japan’s Millennials who supported lifelong employment and one-company careers skyrocketed from 64% and 40% to 87% and 55%, respectively. In fact, last year, less than 7% of 25-34-year-olds switched jobs at all. Overall, Japanese employees leave jobs at less than half the rate of Americans, and younger Japanese workers are “even more risk averse.” (Bloomberg)

“I love reality TV shows. It's always fun to watch average people make themselves look foolish just for a shot at fame.”

—Female, 17, CA

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies