Infographic Snapshot: Millennials and Valentine’s Day

Are Millennials telling Valentine's Day, "I'm just not that into you?" What's their relationship status, will they be celebrating, and who are they buying for? We've got the data on how Millennials are approaching the candy heart holiday. 

Valentine's Day is around the corner, and with Millennial consumers most likely making up the majority of singles who are dating, looking for love, and now starting to settle down, it’s important to understand how they view the holiday. In a recent Ypulse monthly survey, we asked about their relationship statuses, and their plans for and attitudes about February 14th. Here's some of what we found:

55% of Millennials over 18-years-old are either in a relationship or married, so the majority of older Millennials at least have a partner to, in theory, celebrate the holiday with, but that doesn't necessarily mean they embrace the 14th... 

58% of Millennials tell us that they think Valentine’s Day is overrated, and 52% say they don’t really care about the holiday. But at the same time 56% say they are celebrating it. This might explain many Millennials’ somewhat tongue-in-cheek approach to the day. As we said last year, Millennials have a tendency to turn anything they can into a joke to make it more bearable. Around this time of year, that tactic is used by the generation to take on Valentine’s Day, a holiday that can be difficult for anyone, but perhaps especially young consumers who are still figuring out their love lives. It seems even those in a relationship are not as likely to take the holiday too seriously, as is evidenced by the plethora of meme-inspired cards and trends being created by internet users from Tumblr to Twitter. But this is a generation that grew up being told to bring a Valentine for everyone in the class, and a group of consumers always looking for a reason to celebrate. Thinking it is an overrated holiday doesn’t necessarily mean they aren’t acknowledging the day, they just might have a non-traditional approach. It should also be noted that 56% of males said they don't care about Valentine's, compared to 48% of females. 

Of those planning to celebrate, the majority are planning to give a gift to a significant other, but at the same time, 47% will be spending on a gift for a family member or friend. To brands, that could be a big opportunity. Again, many of these young consumers are not taking a traditional approach, so appealing to their desire to celebrate Valentine's with non-love-interest loved ones could be a smart move. (Galentine's anyone?

The 27% who say they avoid going out in public that day could be another opportunity. Seamless is running a campaign encouraging users to stay in and eat at home, and they shouldn't be the only brand thinking of ways to cater to the group that would rather commemorate the day in the comfort of home (and pajamas). The data indicates that Millennials are willing to spend for Valentine's, but their attitudes about the holiday show that convention can be bent and brands can start thinking out of the heart shaped box. 

 

Today’s Infographic Snapshot is a portion of the data deliverable created to illuminate recent data for Gold subscribers twice a month, using stats from our most ongoing surveys of Millennials 13-32-years-old! 

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The Newsfeed

“I observe holidays and religion-based traditions but am more connected to it as a culture than as a religion.”—Female, 27, MA

Chinese youth have a “selfie obsession” that’s changing beauty standards and creating a new tier of celebrity. The Influencer Effect is full blown in China, where young consumers are beautifying their selfies via filter apps like Meitu and plastic surgery—all in the quest to look more like wang hong, their internet celebrities. One influencer, HoneyCC, argues that “Selfies are part of Chinese culture now, and so is Meitu-editing selfies.” But some say the trend is pushing the population to become more homogenous by favoring certain features, and headlines have lashed back against the whitening of skin prevalent in social apps. (The New Yorker)

Eighty-one percent of Bustle, Romper, and Elite Daily’s Millennial readers say social media is the best way for advertisers to reach them. Bustle’s latest questionnaire also found that 40% of their 18-34-year-old readers prefer Instagram for brand communications, followed by trusted websites, email, and online articles. Some other fun insights: Over half believe that a company should give back, instead of just turning a profit, and 49% think “companies should do more to protect the environment.” (Adweek)

Drug use is down among teens—except when it comes to marijuana and vaping. From the 1990s to 2017, the percentage of teens who said they’d been drunk dropped from 46% and 58%, and those reporting they’ve smoked cigarettes from 26% and 17%. However, marijuana use increased for the first time in seven years in 2017, while vaping is up as well, with at least 19% of high school seniors, 16% of sophomores, and 8% of eighth-graders saying they’ve vaped in the past year. (LATimes)

Two modern dating shows are coming to Facebook Watch. The first “unscripted dating show” from SoulPancake, Love & Longitude, is shot on iPhones and shows two potential love interests’ relationship blossoming across FaceTime, social media, and other digital interactions. The second dating show from Machinima, Co-Op Connection, plays into the esports craze. One bachelor gets to pick his partner based on their personality—and their skills at the videogame, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. (tubefiltertubefilter)

Some cities are past their “peak Millennial” populations, as the generation increasingly finds new digs in the suburbs. Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles all reached their highest Millennial population in 2015, and New York and Washington D.C. are showing slowing Millennial growth, according to U.S. Census data. Meanwhile Chicago’s suburbs and others have seen an uptick in their young adult populations—another Millennial myth debunked. Which urban centers are still attracting the demo as they age up? “Tech hubs” like Seattle and San Francisco. (Time)

“Crochet and knitting are very relaxing, therapeutic, and have tangible results."—Female, 31, AL

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