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Some young job applicants are scrapping activism-related activities from their resumes out of fear it makes them less hireable. 

Nov 11 2021

Some young job applicants are scrapping activism-related activities from their resumes out of fear it makes them less hireable. Gen Z and Millennials are some of the most activated generations, consistently showing up on social media to champion causes from Black Lives Matter, to LGBTQ+ discrimination, and climate change while calling on brands to commit to the issues their generations care about. But when it comes to highlighting activism involvement on their professional resumes, young job applicants are worried that employers—particularly privately-held companies—aren’t ready for their passion for activism. According to one 21-year-old who is actively involved in a Black voting rights group and the Black Lives Matter movement, “You want to be tolerable within the diversity and inclusion realm [and not be] the person calling out every little systemic issue in the corporation.” And while there’s no hard evidence that proves young job applicants’ resumes are becoming “too political,” biases can pop up in the hiring process as “hiring managers may initially gravitate toward candidates of their same gender or race due to similarity bias,” notes Jill Ellingson, a professor of human resource management at the University of Kansas. Ellingson explains that political affiliation holds a lot of emotion, especially today, making it difficult for some young job applicants to trust that a potential employer will equitably examine their resume if they’re transparent about the activism-related activities they’re involved in. (The Washington Post)