Reports and Webinars are limited to the Region terms of your Pro and Prime subscription, as shown in “Purchased Regions”.

  • To filter all content types to individual Region(s) you have purchased, apply your Region(s) under “Purchased Regions.”

Articles, Video Updates, and News across all Regions are open to all Pro and Prime subscribers.

  • To see this content for any Region, use the “Content Filter”.

Black parents say their children have had to “grow up faster” and face challenges during the pandemic that White kids don’t have to confront until they’re adults—if at all.

Jan 13 2022

Black parents say their children have had to “grow up faster” and face challenges during the pandemic that White kids don’t have to confront until they’re adults—if at all. YPulse’s Views on America research found that 63% of Millennial parents say racism is getting worse in the U.S. While the year has been full of stress, chaos, and uncertainty for all parents, Black parents say 2021 came with additional challenges since they have also had to talk about issues of race—whether it’s helping their kids explain to their peers the importance of the Black Lives Matter movement, having “the talk” about why Black people are often judged differently than White people, or how to act when they’re stopped by the police. The pandemic has also heavily impacted the education and finances of Black families: According to a survey from The Undefeated and the Kaiser Family Foundation, about half of Black women with children have struggled to pay for basic necessities during the pandemic, and two-thirds of Black parents say someone in their household has been laid off, furloughed, or lost income since February 2020. Our education research found that 70% of Black parents say remote learning has been difficult, and while it has been challenging for Black families, some say it has led to “positive outcomes” for them since their kids don’t have to deal with microaggressions and bullying. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that in the spring of 2020, about 3% of Black parents were homeschooling their children—and by the fall, the number rose to more than 16%. (NBC News)