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Infographic Snapshot: Gen Z & Millennials on What’s Morally Acceptable and What Isn’t

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing

We asked Gen Z and Millennials what they think is morally right and wrong in our latest infographic snapshot:

Morality can be a relative concept. What’s right and what’s wrong can often vary between religious communities, cultures, and, most pertinent to us, generations. Some chalk it up to the internet’s ability to connect people across the world from all walks of life and others to the increased access of higher education, but Millennials have rung in a new era of openness and acceptance. Thanks to Millennials, concepts that were once deemed morally unacceptable are moving into the mainstream—and Gen Z is right behind them to make sure the morality conversation continues. 

However, this doesn’t mean Gen Z’s and Millennials’ moral compasses always stray so far from the generations that came before them. It also doesn’t mean that religion, often the root of moral beliefs, is lost on them. Despite the common media narrative that Millennials and Gen Z are “turning their backs” on religion, we found that the institution still holds value for the young demos. In fact, just four in 10 13-35-year-olds agree that organized religion is a thing of the past and a little more than three in four believe religion can bring people together and strengthen communities. Another role religious beliefs can take, according a little more than half of Gen Z and Millennials, is as an indicator of what’s morally acceptable and what isn’t.

So, what exactly is morally acceptable according to 13-35-year-olds, and what isn’t? And what scenarios “depend on the situation?” We broke it down in our recent Religion and Spirituality survey, and illustrated their responses in the following infographic snapshot:

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing

To download the PDF version of this insight article, click here.