Ypulse Mashup: How Millennial Parents Will Change Families

On June 27th, we’re dedicating our Ypulse Mashup event to Reassessing Millennials. It’s time to stop looking at Millennials as one massive group and pre-prescribing characteristics and misconceptions to all 80 million members. We’re digging into who they really are and the different personalities that exist within the generation by unveiling our first-ever segmentation of the generation. We’re also examining not only how they are changing as they begin to tackle adult milestones, but how they are changing the definition of the milestones themselves.

 The oldest edge of Millennials have entered their 30s, and 4% of Millennials are already parents. That’s over 3 million Millennial parents in the U.S. and growing. Though the generation as a whole has delayed parenthood, 70% of Millennials who aren’t yet parents say that they want kids, and 26% of them want kids within the next five years. That’s a huge wave of Millennials who are going to become parents in the relatively near future, and they’re approaching parenthood with their own expectations. Just as they have begun navigating adulthood by picking and choosing the things that work for them, we’re seeing that these influential and unique consumers are already attempting to tackle parenthood in their own way, and negotiate traditional parenting structures on their own terms. Here are just a few of the ways Millennials could reassess parenthood, and shift family culture:

 

1. Bringing Baby to the Biergarten

Many Millennials are children of helicopter parents who know what it’s like to be doted on from birth. Boomers tended to structure their own families so that their Millennial children were the focus, and gained a reputation for letting their lives and decisions revolve around the kids. And though they appreciate the attention…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “If a photo of me went viral, I would feel angry but…maybe I would be a little excited because it went viral, as long as the picture is not bad.” –Female, 16, TN

57% of Millennials ages 18-32 say they plan to get a new job within the next year, according to one of Ypulse’s bi-weekly Millennial surveys, fielded this June. The generation is known for their predilection for moving from job to job, and now some businesses are making “generational training” a part of their management instruction in order to keep these younger workers happy. Giving them a purpose, plenty of time off, global opportunities, and a clear career path plan within the company are all tactics being used to retain them. (Businessweek)

Back to school marketing is starting in full force, and Target is relying heavily on digital to reach college students, in more ways than one. The retailer has launched a campaign employing major YouTube stars, like Tiffany Garcia and Mikey Bolts, to sell apparel, electronics, and furnishings, featuring them in four YouTube shows that make over dorm rooms and offer decorating tips. The video series lives online so that Target can “be part of the ongoing conversation” and “go where the [M]illennial generation is.” (NYTimes)

Millennial-hate is easy to find online, where articles like “Millennials, the Friendly Cutthrout Generation” and “Millennials' Political Views Don't Make Any Sense” seem to appear on a daily basis. But how do Millennials themselves feel about the bad rap they’re getting? One Millennial’s response to some recent Millennial surveys puts things into perspective, wondering if the generation is just more likely to admit things, and whether they “are just like...everybody else?” (Gothamist)

Beyoncé is no stranger to celebrity endorsement, but her latest unexpected marketing trick goes outside the box. This weekend, the powerhouse artist teased a new 50 Shades of Grey trailer by posting a 15-second clip of it on her Instagram with a “darker remix” of her "Crazy in Love" playing as a soundtrack. The teaser was posted with the hashtag #fiftyshades, attracting the attention of both the singer’s fans and the book series’ avid fandom. (MTV)

Rosetta Stone’s new campaign is aimed at Millennials, shifting focus from the product itself to the idea that “people who learn new languages are able to share experiences with people from other places.” The ads will run on more youth-focused channels than Rosetta has appeared on before, like MTV, VH1, and Comedy Central, but the majority of the campaign will be heavily digital and social, and include online webisodes that will air on Vice. (MediaPost)

Did you know that Ypulse tracks social media trends in our biweekly surveys? We found that Vine, Twitter, and YouTube have seen steady growth since November 2013, gaining 7%, 11%, and 12% more Millennial users, respectively. Our Silver and Gold tier subscribers can find helpful visuals that detail our tracked trends in the Data Room on Ypulse.com. (Ypulse)

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