Ypulse Mashup: How Millennial Parents Will Change Families

On June 27th, we’re dedicating our Ypulse Mashup event to Reassessing Millennials. It’s time to stop looking at Millennials as one massive group and pre-prescribing characteristics and misconceptions to all 80 million members. We’re digging into who they really are and the different personalities that exist within the generation by unveiling our first-ever segmentation of the generation. We’re also examining not only how they are changing as they begin to tackle adult milestones, but how they are changing the definition of the milestones themselves.

 The oldest edge of Millennials have entered their 30s, and 4% of Millennials are already parents. That’s over 3 million Millennial parents in the U.S. and growing. Though the generation as a whole has delayed parenthood, 70% of Millennials who aren’t yet parents say that they want kids, and 26% of them want kids within the next five years. That’s a huge wave of Millennials who are going to become parents in the relatively near future, and they’re approaching parenthood with their own expectations. Just as they have begun navigating adulthood by picking and choosing the things that work for them, we’re seeing that these influential and unique consumers are already attempting to tackle parenthood in their own way, and negotiate traditional parenting structures on their own terms. Here are just a few of the ways Millennials could reassess parenthood, and shift family culture:


1. Bringing Baby to the Biergarten

Many Millennials are children of helicopter parents who know what it’s like to be doted on from birth. Boomers tended to structure their own families so that their Millennial children were the focus, and gained a reputation for letting their lives and decisions revolve around the kids. And though they appreciate the attention…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I would want anyone that is not named Clinton or Trump to be the next president.”—Male, 23, NY

Millennials are so not feeling this election. In a recent Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, only 54% of voters under the age of 35 say they are highly interested in the current campaign, a 6% decrease from 2012, and 18% below the general voter population. Millennials’ level of enthusiasm is a stark contrast from the past two presidential campaigns, which is troubling for current candidates since President Obama’s election relied heavily on the college student vote in battleground states. The poll—which was conducted from Oct. 10-13—also revealed that Clinton was leading Trump among 18-29-year-old voters by only 13%. (The Wall Street Journal

Chipotle has launched a weekly Snapchat show to get Millennials on their side once again. School of Guac is targeted to 13-24-year-olds, and is described as “after-school special meets variety show meets satirical news program.” Young performer Lorena Russi hosts the minute-long episodes, which can vary from DIY with burrito foil to an explanation on why tortilla chips are triangular. Unlike other brands’ TV programming created for Snapchat, Chipotle’s resembles the polished content usually found on traditional TV, and even incorporates fake commercials.  (Digiday

Millennials will be a crucial player in the real estate revolution of next year. In what is described as a “‘Oh, shift’ moment” for the housing market, 52% of potential home buyers next year will be first-timers, and 61% of them will be under the age of 35—according to an annual survey from realtor.com®. Millennials will be mostly seeking a home is for growing families, and almost four in ten of 25-34-year-olds say single-family homes will be the type they’ll be looking to buy, followed by townhomes. Ample space, yards, and safe neighborhoods are also in demand, with 28% stating they will like to live near the suburbs, followed by 22% who prefer outlying suburbs. (Realtor.com

Netflix is almost “12 times more popular among teens” compared to other streaming services. Piper Jaffray’s recent semiannual survey on U.S. teenagers revealed that 37% of teens are watching Netflix daily— a significant number when only 3% can say the same for Hulu and Amazon Prime Video. YouTube came in second for teen daily video consumption at 26%, an upward trend for the platform and the first time it has come ahead of cable TV which followed at 25%. (Tech Times

Facebook wants to connect online friends in the offline world. The social platform has released a new batch of tools to let users buy tickets to events, schedule appointment with businesses, and get local dining recommendations from friends by selecting an area from their News Feed maps. The update was created to solve the “unbelievably challenging process in 2016 to figure out what there is to go do, and then…decide which of those things you want to go do and then actually engage in the doing of said things." They’ve also expanded activity streams to let users track what events their friends go to and their suggestions. (Mashable

Quote of the Day: “I like Last Week Tonight With John Oliver because he dives very deep into topics that are not always appealing, pleasant, or interesting. He turns these topics into something hilarious, entertaining, and educational at the same time.”—Male, 32, KY

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