Millennials In The Workforce: Work-Life Integration

Point of View

Millennials In The Workforce: A Work-Life Integration

In the coming week Ypulse takes a closer look at how the next generation is changing the face of labor and how corporations are beginning to adapt to new models. In addition to our Essentials list, we’ve interviewed 24-year-old, David Burstein of Fast Future, and Lauren Berger of The Intern Queen will be weighing in on how the internship model is changing. Ypulse’s President, Dan Coates will opt-in with his Gen X perspective and Danielle Gizzo, a Youth Advisory Board Member will tell us about her experience as a Millennial in the workforce. 

While a new generation emerges into the workforce, it is only natural that a shift is taking place in the way companies are hiring, retaining, managing and designing internal policies and practices to appeal to the attitudes and expectations of a younger digitally native workforce. 

No more is the goal a work-life balance, but with this passionate generation, it’s all about doing what you love for a living and making it meaningful. The question: “what will I get out of bed for (in my parents' house)?” has increased  expectations beyond any other decade. Work-life balance has transcended into work-life integration. In a world where boundaries are increasingly blurring, more specifically with technology and access anytime and anywhere, this flattened, networked model is now infiltrating into the way Millennials expect to live their everyday lives. A study reveals that Millennials are connected to an average of 16 co-workers on Facebook, which they expect to be able to check while on the clock. Because of their digital, fluid and collective mindset, Millennials and the generation proceeding them are changing the way the world will work in the future. 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My dream for the future is complete financial independence from parents and any others, and a very satisfying career that I enjoy (a high salary would be a plus, but not essential).” –Male, 25, PA

The pickup game could become a thing of the past. According to ESPN, playground basketball as we’ve known it is dying. Crime has pushed many urban kids off of outdoor sports spaces to indoor courts that can be controlled. Meanwhile, high school players who want a future in the sport are turning to organized leagues like the Amateur Athletic Union over yard games where “street cred” ruled over building skills to showcase for schools. (ESPN)

Let wants to be the “ultimate, coolest” social network for teens. The app was built on the concept that “Facebook is not for teenagers anymore” and that they are looking for a more positive, gamified experience. Let creates leaderboards to show the members who have amassed the most stars, the equivalent of a Like, and has recently gained members—reportedly doubling in size every two weeks—thanks to YouTube stars like Jake Boys joining and “bringing their followings with them.” (TechCrunch)

Are Millennial marriages in beta? A lot has been said about the generation’s delayed walk down the aisle and their rearrangement of traditional adult milestones. Now, a new study has found that even after they’ve walked down the aisle it might just be to test the waters: 43% of Millennials “would support a marriage model that involved a two-year trial,” and 33% would be open to licenses that require the “terms” to be renegotiated after a certain amount of time.  (Time)

Young consumers have made music streaming their clear preference, and it is currently the only area in the recorded music industry experiencing growth. Apps like Spotify, Pandora, and iHeart Radio are competing for their attention, and their loyalty. But an epic streaming battle could be about to begin: tech titans like Apple, Google, and Amazon are acquiring their own streaming tools in order to control the future of the music market. (Quartz)

Some are dubious as to whether social apps can create real media stars, but it can’t be denied that for young artists today the path to fame has diversified, and online followings can impact careers. Case in point: 15-year-old Vine star Shawn Mendes’ self-titled EP hit No. 1 on iTunes only 37 minutes after its release, thanks in part to his 2.9 million followers spreading a #ShawnToNumber1 hashtag. (Mashable)

Quote of the Day: “My dream for the future is to become an entrepreneur so I can become my own boss. I also want to become successful to help other people who are in need.” – Female, 23, CA

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