Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever?

Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever? 

The lifespan of social media has been continually shrinking in the face of social media’s growth. As content becomes easier to both share and make, viral memes can reach an internet saturation point much quicker than even those of a few years ago. Early memes like the Dancing Baby were able to keep relevance for several months due to the slow nature of e-mail forwards. By the time LOLCats, Chocolate Rain, and other post-Facebook memes hit the scene, a star could rise and fall in a single month. But just because the majority of the internet has had their fill doesn’t mean that latecomers won’t try and keep the party going. Light internet users will always get to trends after the power users, and a grandmother watching that “Gangam Style” Superbowl commercial will have lots of questions about it. Ubiquity might make the length of a trend overstay its welcome, but it can’t do much to rush it out the door.

Of course, individuals aren’t the only ones paying attention to viral videos. PR and marketing professionals know when a trend is rising – and when it’s safe enough that they can use it for their own devices. Nabisco made a brilliant move by releasing a “lights out” commercial during the Super Bowl blackout, but not everyone can move so quickly. In fact, the larger the organization the harder it is, by definition, to move quickly. In many ways, companies need a SWAT team (with a member of their legal team included in that) prepared just for real-time reactions. But authenticity is important too. A South Park episode that references planking can probably tackle it without feeling forced. The Today Show, on the other hand, parodying “Friday” might not go over so well. In fact, a lot of companies should keep aware that many social media memes are…

 
 
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Quote of the Day: “It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without the food and getting ready for Black Friday” –Female, 19, CA

Brands are continuing to learn that labeling toys by gender is not always ok with the next generation. In the latest case, a photo of seven-year-old little girl reacting to a sign saying a superhero clock was a “fun gift for boys” has gone viral. The girl is a big fan of superheroes and told her mother the brand was “being stupid” by labeling a product she liked in that way—but really her facial expression tells the whole story. In reaction to the photo, Tesco has taken down gendered toy signs from all of its stores. (The Daily Dot)

Teaching kids about danger today involves a whole that parents probably didn’t have to contend with when they were growing up. Between privacy online and the dangers of technology overload, they could use a little help, and PBS Kids has launched a new show with exactly that goal. Ruff Ruffman: Humble Media Genius is a new animated series starring a “manic” dog (Ruff) who tackles a new technological issue in each episode. The show is streaming on the PBS Kids website and YouTube, and plans to continuously evolve to “keep pace with kids’ changing media usage.” (Fast Company)

44% of Millennials 21-27-years-old have never drank a Budweiser, and the brand is shifting to try and attract this new generation of consumers. New TV spots will drop the traditional Clydesdales and instead feature young people, and a new campaign will also involve music festival partnerships, and parties in college towns featuring Jay Z. But some are warning that to really appeal to Millennials, Budweiser shouldn’t look like they’re trying too hard. (TimePR Newser)

According to a report from BuzzFeed, more than 50% of Millennials 18-34-years-old read the site each month, which makes their reach higher than many TV networks, including CBS, NBC, FX, Comedy Central, MTV, and AMC. The report indicates that “BuzzFeed is definitely becoming a media destination among young people — not just a habitual browse,” and with the site continuing to build their video content, they could rival TV in even more ways. (Business Insider)

Tech is often blamed for isolating young users and disrupting real social connections. But interestingly, a recent study has found that teen loneliness actually declined between 1978 and 2009, which means today’s teens could actually be less lonely than their parents were. The study also found that though young people today are more independent, and less likely to join clubs, “they have less need for feeling attached to a large group of friends.” (CNN)

On an average day, 33% of Millennials spend money on fast food/take out, 26% spend on groceries, and 14% spend on dining out. Our tracked data trends have all the stats on that and more, thanks to our monthly survey of 1000 13-32-year-old Millennials nationwide. Our Silver and Gold subscribers get access to regularly updated charts following average daily spend and items purchased, with spending broken out by age and gender. We do the heavy data lifting for you, and we’re constantly adding new data to our trends. (Ypulse)

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