Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever?

Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever? 

The lifespan of social media has been continually shrinking in the face of social media’s growth. As content becomes easier to both share and make, viral memes can reach an internet saturation point much quicker than even those of a few years ago. Early memes like the Dancing Baby were able to keep relevance for several months due to the slow nature of e-mail forwards. By the time LOLCats, Chocolate Rain, and other post-Facebook memes hit the scene, a star could rise and fall in a single month. But just because the majority of the internet has had their fill doesn’t mean that latecomers won’t try and keep the party going. Light internet users will always get to trends after the power users, and a grandmother watching that “Gangam Style” Superbowl commercial will have lots of questions about it. Ubiquity might make the length of a trend overstay its welcome, but it can’t do much to rush it out the door.

Of course, individuals aren’t the only ones paying attention to viral videos. PR and marketing professionals know when a trend is rising – and when it’s safe enough that they can use it for their own devices. Nabisco made a brilliant move by releasing a “lights out” commercial during the Super Bowl blackout, but not everyone can move so quickly. In fact, the larger the organization the harder it is, by definition, to move quickly. In many ways, companies need a SWAT team (with a member of their legal team included in that) prepared just for real-time reactions. But authenticity is important too. A South Park episode that references planking can probably tackle it without feeling forced. The Today Show, on the other hand, parodying “Friday” might not go over so well. In fact, a lot of companies should keep aware that many social media memes are…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I want to buy a home in the future to be able to own and modify my own space. “ –Female, 32, NE

Apple Music is here, but some say that Millennials won’t pay for it. The new music streaming service launched yesterday, and will cost users $9.99 a month to stream the entire iTunes catalog. However, young consumers are adept at getting their music for free, and the CEO of CMJ predicts “for major music audiences at college level and younger music fans…they will be heavily inclined to stay with and find new ‘free’ services,’” (The Daily Beast)

Salad is so hot right now. Farm-to-table salad chain sweetgreen has raised another $35 million to “satisfy Millennial salad cravings.” The chain will likely continue their expansion, and appealing to younger diners with menu items like “Beets Don’t Kale My Vibe” and branded music festivals. Tech is also a part of their plan: sweetgreen is also developing their ordering app, which already handles 25% of all their transactions. (TechCrunch)

They may have grown up with “Made In China” stamped on the bottom of all their toys, but Millennials may be “the most passionate” about products that are made in America. According to a Ford Motor Company poll, 91% of 16-34-year-olds believe that manufacturers in the U.S. make products that are equal or better quality as foreign competitors, and 74% believe purchasing American-made products is important. (We did tell you they’re patriotic) (Washington Examiner)

Earlier this week we told you about Marriott’s efforts to adjust to young consumers’ traveling preferences, and it looks like rooftop bars are only the beginning. The brand has partnered with Universal Music Group to bring music performances by rising and established artists to hotel lobbies. Jessie J kicked off the venture yesterday in London, and all performances will be free to the hotel guests. (LA Times)

Is the sharing economy hurting Millennials? Some experts are saying that while all this car sharing, home sharing, and rent-everything behavior is well and good in the short term, young consumers “are missing out on recouping the gains from owning appreciating assets.” The idea is that the share economy is delaying Millennials' wealth-accumulation, and contributing to their downward mobility. Ouch. (Time)

Our most recent trend report is now available! The Q2 2015 Ypulse Quarterly covers three major trends we see impacting young consumers, and includes recently fielded data on 13-32-year-olds, Ypulse’s expertise, the most relevant takeaways for brands who want to appeal to Millennials and teens, and tons of other insights. The Q2 2015 report is available to Gold subscribers, and one-off pricing is $1250. (Click here to contact us for information on accessing the report or to learn more about subscribing.

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