Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever?

Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever? 

The lifespan of social media has been continually shrinking in the face of social media’s growth. As content becomes easier to both share and make, viral memes can reach an internet saturation point much quicker than even those of a few years ago. Early memes like the Dancing Baby were able to keep relevance for several months due to the slow nature of e-mail forwards. By the time LOLCats, Chocolate Rain, and other post-Facebook memes hit the scene, a star could rise and fall in a single month. But just because the majority of the internet has had their fill doesn’t mean that latecomers won’t try and keep the party going. Light internet users will always get to trends after the power users, and a grandmother watching that “Gangam Style” Superbowl commercial will have lots of questions about it. Ubiquity might make the length of a trend overstay its welcome, but it can’t do much to rush it out the door.

Of course, individuals aren’t the only ones paying attention to viral videos. PR and marketing professionals know when a trend is rising – and when it’s safe enough that they can use it for their own devices. Nabisco made a brilliant move by releasing a “lights out” commercial during the Super Bowl blackout, but not everyone can move so quickly. In fact, the larger the organization the harder it is, by definition, to move quickly. In many ways, companies need a SWAT team (with a member of their legal team included in that) prepared just for real-time reactions. But authenticity is important too. A South Park episode that references planking can probably tackle it without feeling forced. The Today Show, on the other hand, parodying “Friday” might not go over so well. In fact, a lot of companies should keep aware that many social media memes are…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “There are so many places I would love to go! I’ve never been to Greece. I would like to go with some close friends and just take in the local culture and food and relax.” –Female, 30, IN

According to Ypulse’s May monthly survey, 41% of 13-32-year-olds regularly use Spotify to listen to music. But the app wants to be their one-stop-entertainment shop, and has just added video and podcasts to the platform. Media partners, including Slate, BBC, Conde Nast, and Adult Swim, will offer clips of video content to be streamed by users. The move puts Spotify in the ranks of other social platforms “determined to become everything to everyone.” (TechCrunchWired)

While some social media giants (Facebook, Snapchat, and now Spotify) want to be young consumers' portal for all media, others are becoming more and more focused on single functions. New apps Catchpool and This. (with a period) allow users to post only one thing each day, pushing only “high-quality content” into feeds. The approach gets rid of overwhelming social clutter in favor of those things users are most passionate about. (Fast Company)

Pizza Hut is the latest brand to use selfies in marketing—but they’re taking a slightly different approach. Their new two foot pizzas are too big to be captured in a regular selfie, so the chain has created a selfie stick parody PSA, warning against the “dangers of selfie stick abuse.” Branding in the video is purposefully secondary to the entertainment, but the spot does walk a fine line between winkingly acknowledging customers’ behavior, and making fun of them for it. (Adweek)

We’ve told you that Millennials are embracing wine, and that big beer is struggling to win over the new generation of drinkers. Morgan Stanley Research has found the number of Millennials who say beer is their favorite alcoholic drink actually fell over 5% since 2012. In response, we’ve seen beer brands roll out new products, flavors, and campaigns attempting to provide new exciting beverage options for these potential industry killers. (Business Insider)

American Eagle is hoping their new label will help them to win back teens. The brand, Don’t Ask Why, follows the recently popular trends of “soft dressing, restricted sizing, [and] a California aesthetic.” Those qualities make it very similar to the Brandy Melville brand, which has had a lot of success with young female shoppers. Don’t Ask Why is being used to test and experiment with concepts that could be applied to AE products if successful. (Racked)

What if you could collect all the young consumer insights, data, and news most relevant to you in one easily accessed spot? Oh wait, you can! On Ypulse.com, Bronze, Silver and Gold subscribers can click on the star icons next to any insight article or news feed item to immediately store them in the Library tab, creating a repository of relevant information—curated by you. (Ypulse)

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies