Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever?

Harlem Shakes: Shortest Meme Ever? 

The lifespan of social media has been continually shrinking in the face of social media’s growth. As content becomes easier to both share and make, viral memes can reach an internet saturation point much quicker than even those of a few years ago. Early memes like the Dancing Baby were able to keep relevance for several months due to the slow nature of e-mail forwards. By the time LOLCats, Chocolate Rain, and other post-Facebook memes hit the scene, a star could rise and fall in a single month. But just because the majority of the internet has had their fill doesn’t mean that latecomers won’t try and keep the party going. Light internet users will always get to trends after the power users, and a grandmother watching that “Gangam Style” Superbowl commercial will have lots of questions about it. Ubiquity might make the length of a trend overstay its welcome, but it can’t do much to rush it out the door.

Of course, individuals aren’t the only ones paying attention to viral videos. PR and marketing professionals know when a trend is rising – and when it’s safe enough that they can use it for their own devices. Nabisco made a brilliant move by releasing a “lights out” commercial during the Super Bowl blackout, but not everyone can move so quickly. In fact, the larger the organization the harder it is, by definition, to move quickly. In many ways, companies need a SWAT team (with a member of their legal team included in that) prepared just for real-time reactions. But authenticity is important too. A South Park episode that references planking can probably tackle it without feeling forced. The Today Show, on the other hand, parodying “Friday” might not go over so well. In fact, a lot of companies should keep aware that many social media memes are…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the day: “I learned to cook with ship-to-home meals like Blue Apron.” –Male, 24, IL

Lego has an imaginary friend that they want you to meet. The brand's latest video campaign, created in partnership with Facebook, asks kids around the world to define and build a “kronkiwongi,” whatever they imagine it might be. The clips celebrate kids’ imaginations and creativity, and the brand is hoping to engage and inspire parents with the content. Participants are encouraged to upload videos of their own kids’ kronkiwongi creations, which will be compiled into a final video showcasing all the submissions. (Campaign Live)

YouTube’s #humblebrag last week was well deserved, as the site comes in at number one for U.S. tweens and teens. According to a survey by KidSay, 89% of 8-15-year-olds use YouTube, and 44% subscribe to between one and 10 channels, while 35% subscribe to more than 21 channels. 29% of tweens and teens say watching videos is what they do most while online, with boys gravitating towards game-related channels and girls watching more DIY, life-style centric channels. According to Ypulse’s social media tracker, 79% of 13-32-year-olds currently say they have a YouTube account. (Kidscreen)

Ever wonder why music taste varies by generation? According to a study by Spotify and Echo Nest data, taste in music is solidified around 33-years-old, after which it becomes more rare to seek out new music. This “taste freeze,” when music preferences are locked in, happens when listeners stop listening to what’s considered popular music, and instead return to “the music that was popular when they were coming of age.” The study illustrates that listeners’ interest in new music continues until around 25, then slows to “maturity” in the mid-30s. (Uproxx)

BMW wants to make Drivers Ed cool. The luxury car brand is offering teens in several major U.S. cities a free, two-hour driving class that teaches “safety and fun” and also puts participants behind the wheels of several BMW models. The free class is a shortened version of their two day, $1,295 hands-on course that lets kids learn about everything from hand placement to high-speed breaking, and take the Beemers out for a spin on a road course to improve their skills, and presumably become more attached to the brand. (Time)

Last week anonymous group Never 21 took over Millennial-favorite brand Forever 21’s flagship store in New York City to spread awareness of the young people of color who were never able to reach age 21 due to police violence. The group hung a #BlackLivesMatter banner in the window and dressed the mannequins in “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts. We’re continuing to see Millennials step forward and become a part of social activism movements around the world. (Refinery29)

Let’s face it—we are living in the age of the selfie. It’s a legitimate Webster term, the new autograph, a way to say hi, and we’ve taken a closer look at the current status of young consumers and the selfie for you. Check out our most recentInfographic Snapshot, which breaks down complex data into an easy to understand and quick to digest visual takeaway. Our Gold and Silver subscribers are given access to our regularly published informative Infographic Snapshots that take our proprietary monthly survey stats and synthesize them to tell a story about this generation’s behaviors and views. (Ypulse)

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