Halloween Provides A Glimpse Into The Top Millennial Trends

Halloween isn’t just a chance to dress up, eat lots of candy, and watch scary movies. It’s a major time for marketers to understand consumers who are expected to spend $8 billion on the holiday this year. Besides tricks and treats, Halloween provides perspective on some of the biggest trends...just take a look at what people are dressing up as and how they get their costume ideas. So in the spirit of Halloween, we spoke to more than 700 Millennials about their Halloween outfits and inspiration, and many of our findings offer insights to further understand this generation.

WaldoThe ‘90s Are All That

It’s no secret that Millennials are nostalgic for the ‘90s, but Halloween highlights just how much they miss this decade and the simpler times that it represents. Many Millennials mentioned that they dressed up/are dressing up as iconic characters from ‘90s TV shows, books, video games, and even board games because these characters and objects are meaningful to them. For example, one Millennial told us that she dressed as Ms. Frizzle from the books and show “The Magic School Bus” because she loved the series growing up and still thinks it’s awesome. Another said he dressed as Chuckie from “Rugrats” because he too enjoyed it as a kid and still does thanks to reruns. Another Millennial said she's being a character from Candy Land, which is particularly relevant with the resurgence of board games. Numerous other young people mentioned that they're dressing as Pokeman, Mario (from Super Mario Bros.), Waldo, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and the always popular Disney princesses. As many of these characters are coming back through reboots or the wave of ‘90s nostalgia taking culture by storm, Millennials are very much excited and want to show their enthusiasm for this period.

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My dream for the future is complete financial independence from parents and any others, and a very satisfying career that I enjoy (a high salary would be a plus, but not essential).” –Male, 25, PA

The pickup game could become a thing of the past. According to ESPN, playground basketball as we’ve known it is dying. Crime has pushed many urban kids off of outdoor sports spaces to indoor courts that can be controlled. Meanwhile, high school players who want a future in the sport are turning to organized leagues like the Amateur Athletic Union over yard games where “street cred” ruled over building skills to showcase for schools. (ESPN)

Let wants to be the “ultimate, coolest” social network for teens. The app was built on the concept that “Facebook is not for teenagers anymore” and that they are looking for a more positive, gamified experience. Let creates leaderboards to show the members who have amassed the most stars, the equivalent of a Like, and has recently gained members—reportedly doubling in size every two weeks—thanks to YouTube stars like Jake Boys joining and “bringing their followings with them.” (TechCrunch)

Are Millennial marriages in beta? A lot has been said about the generation’s delayed walk down the aisle and their rearrangement of traditional adult milestones. Now, a new study has found that even after they’ve walked down the aisle it might just be to test the waters: 43% of Millennials “would support a marriage model that involved a two-year trial,” and 33% would be open to licenses that require the “terms” to be renegotiated after a certain amount of time.  (Time)

Young consumers have made music streaming their clear preference, and it is currently the only area in the recorded music industry experiencing growth. Apps like Spotify, Pandora, and iHeart Radio are competing for their attention, and their loyalty. But an epic streaming battle could be about to begin: tech titans like Apple, Google, and Amazon are acquiring their own streaming tools in order to control the future of the music market. (Quartz)

Some are dubious as to whether social apps can create real media stars, but it can’t be denied that for young artists today the path to fame has diversified, and online followings can impact careers. Case in point: 15-year-old Vine star Shawn Mendes’ self-titled EP hit No. 1 on iTunes only 37 minutes after its release, thanks in part to his 2.9 million followers spreading a #ShawnToNumber1 hashtag. (Mashable)

Quote of the Day: “My dream for the future is to become an entrepreneur so I can become my own boss. I also want to become successful to help other people who are in need.” – Female, 23, CA

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