How Electronic Dance Music Is Changing Contemporary Culture

Electric Daisy Carnival. Ultra. Electric Zoo. These are among the many music festivals where you'll find Millennials as electronic dance music (EDM) has risen in popularity in recent years, sparked by Gen Y's desire to experience events "IRL" (in real life). This genre has exploded lately; in fact, the VMAs added the Best Electronic Dance Music Video category this year and college students are blasting these sounds all over campus. EDM represents a very Millennial mindset of mixing sounds and not being limited to one genre. In many ways, it's changing the culture of music today as YAB member Matt explains.

How Electronic Dance Music Is Changing Contemporary Culture

EDMIt’s been said that Electronic Dance Music (EDM) is taking over the music world.

From Nicki Minaj’s “Starships” to Justin Bieber’s “As Long As You Love Me,” pop music has adopted a different sound thanks to EDM’s rise in popularity among Millennials, particularly college students.

Catchy synthesizers and heavy bass lines have become the trademark sound for the new generation of listeners who look to music for an uplifting shot in the arm. Mix a Calvin Harris or David Guetta beat with pop music’s trademark synthesized vocals and you have an instant radio hit.

Even vocal verses are no longer a necessity for pop listeners, as evidenced by the popularity of Avicii’s “Levels,” which dominated radio airwaves no less than a year ago.

Since Gen Y has unquestionably attached itself to EDM and claimed the genre as its own, it’s easy to forget just how far EDM has come from the days before it dominated Billboard charts. Now merged with the familiar sounds of pop radio, EDM has deviated far from its roots as a genre with an underground cult following in Europe.

An encompassing acronym that includes aspects of house,…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I haven’t had children yet because I need to finish school first.” –Female, 30, IL

Yesterday, Microsoft bought the company behind the wildly popular game Minecraft, and in doing so they’ve acquired a “multigenerational success story” and could be regaining some cool cred with younger consumers. It turns out, parents love the game, and many young Millennials and post-Millennials have embraced exploring the digital Minecraft world, hacking, building, and collaborating in the lo-fi game. (The Verge)

Yesterday, Microsoft bought the company behind the wildly popular game Minecraft, and in doing so they’ve acquired a “multigenerational success story” and could be regaining some cool cred with younger consumers. It turns out, parents love the game, and many young Millennials and post-Millennials have embraced exploring the digital Minecraft world, hacking, building, and collaborating in the lo-fi game. (The Verge)

When we asked Millennials if they would download another photo sharing app, only 17% of 18-24-year-olds said yes. Of course, if the right app caught on, they’d likely jump onboard to keep up with friends—but the truth is, it is getting harder to get consumers to try new apps. While people are spending more time on the apps they already have, especially music, fitness, and social networking apps, 65.5% in the U.S. say they aren’t downloading any in an average month. (Quartz)

Boomers grew up with protest songs as an intrinsic part of their musical culture, and sometimes like to criticize Millennials for their lack of similar tunes. But EMA’s self-released new track “False Flag” could quiet those complaints. The song talks about the experience of a generation “growing up in the shadow of 9/11,” and how that cultural turning point changed, and maybe stole, her generation’s future. (Flavorwire)

Apple’s iPhone 6 is of course the big smartphone news of the week, but while that announcement has taken over headlines, other brands are quietly innovating in the category to appeal to more niche mobile users. Panasonic has returned to the phone market, with the launch of a “connected camera,” a smartphone camera hybrid that is meant to appeal to those who are more interested in the quality of the photos they are shooting on the go than the phone features they can boast. (Engadget)

In 2013, the birth rate among women 20-24-years-old was at a record low, and it continued to decline for those 25-29-years-old. These low rates could be “here to stay,” and that might be a good thing for both Millennial moms and their kids. Working women are gaining more salary and experience with every year they delay motherhood, and their future children could have greater opportunities and even a higher lifetime income. (Bloomberg)

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