How Electronic Dance Music Is Changing Contemporary Culture

Electric Daisy Carnival. Ultra. Electric Zoo. These are among the many music festivals where you'll find Millennials as electronic dance music (EDM) has risen in popularity in recent years, sparked by Gen Y's desire to experience events "IRL" (in real life). This genre has exploded lately; in fact, the VMAs added the Best Electronic Dance Music Video category this year and college students are blasting these sounds all over campus. EDM represents a very Millennial mindset of mixing sounds and not being limited to one genre. In many ways, it's changing the culture of music today as YAB member Matt explains.

How Electronic Dance Music Is Changing Contemporary Culture

EDMIt’s been said that Electronic Dance Music (EDM) is taking over the music world.

From Nicki Minaj’s “Starships” to Justin Bieber’s “As Long As You Love Me,” pop music has adopted a different sound thanks to EDM’s rise in popularity among Millennials, particularly college students.

Catchy synthesizers and heavy bass lines have become the trademark sound for the new generation of listeners who look to music for an uplifting shot in the arm. Mix a Calvin Harris or David Guetta beat with pop music’s trademark synthesized vocals and you have an instant radio hit.

Even vocal verses are no longer a necessity for pop listeners, as evidenced by the popularity of Avicii’s “Levels,” which dominated radio airwaves no less than a year ago.

Since Gen Y has unquestionably attached itself to EDM and claimed the genre as its own, it’s easy to forget just how far EDM has come from the days before it dominated Billboard charts. Now merged with the familiar sounds of pop radio, EDM has deviated far from its roots as a genre with an underground cult following in Europe.

An encompassing acronym that includes aspects of house,…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

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The Obama administration is trying new and aggressive approaches to get young adults to sign up for health insurance. Less than 30% of the 13 million people who have signed up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act so far have been 18-34-year-olds—a group critical to the law’s success. To reach uninsured under-35-year-olds, the administration plans to advertise on video platform Twitch, and social networks like Facebook, Snapchat, and Tumblr. The campaign will revolve around the hashtag #HeavyAdulting and focus on medical issues most relevant to the group, like reproductive health. (The Wall Street Journal)

Family-friendly brands are creating content for Mattel’s updated View-Master toy. The Littlstar Family app—which can be uploaded on to an Apple or Android and then used along with Mattel’s virtual reality and 360-degree capable View-Master—will feature an extensive library of content from National Geographic, Disney, Bento Box Entertainment and Discovery Channel. Focused on immersive, Mattel also plans to launch a VR Batman experience for the toy this fall(Kidscreen

General Motors is going after experience-hungry young consumers who would rather share a car than own one. Their new start-up brand Maven offers a car sharing service that can paid for by the hour or day (no membership fee) and will be “rolling out city-by-city.” To market the new service, the brand sought out “local experts and connoisseurs” to tell stories that will “bring new cities to life.” An additional Maven service that will offer rides to airports will also be launched soon. (Ad Age)  

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