AwesomenessTV Provides Must-See Content For Tweens & Teens

AwesomenessYouth today are turning to the web to watch much of their programming, which is why professional YouTube channels like AwesomenessTV are capturing their attention and proving to be...well, awesome! The channel, which launched in June, has already attracted 12 million views and appeals to 12-17-year-olds who seek short shows that fits their attention span.

Tune in to any of the 15 shows on the newly created YouTube channel and you’ll instantly be immersed in the lives and interests of tweens and teens. Brian Robbins — a veteran of the TV industry who’s directed and produced TV series for youth on Nickelodeon and The CW — was inspired to create the channel as he saw his sons’ viewing habits shift from the small screen to an even smaller one. Knowing that networks have found it challenging to reach tweens in the past few years, he decided to do something about it. So came AwesomenessTV.

IMOThe channel has a wide range of programs from sporting events and game shows to music videos and tween/teen talk shows including the popular program, “IMO” (In My Opinion). The show is a younger version of “The View” hosted by YouTube stars, Twitter prodigies, and actresses on teen TV shows. During each episode, the girls sit on a couch chatting about the latest pop culture news, trends, and topics affecting people their age. Then there’s “Make Me Over,” where teens can request for them or their friends to get style suggestions from the Awesomeness team. Think TLC for teens. Music fans will enjoy “Mindless Takeover” which follows the popular boy band Mindless Behavior, “Kat Graham Road To” featuring “The Vampire Diaries” star on her path to becoming a pop star, and “Greyson Chance Takeover” which shows the singer throughout his world tour.

Sk8 SpotterzBut AwesomenessTV appeals to guys too. “That Was Awesome”…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I put off/dread calling people in general. Everything should be done online by this time!” –Female, 30, FL 

In a continued effort to draw back the teen consumers they’ve lost, Abercrombie & Fitch’s logo will “be dead” in U.S. stores by 2015. Globally, the Abercrombie and Hollister logos and names will still be used on designs, but will be phased out here where the brand knows it is no longer considered a status symbol. Abercrombie’s sales continue to fall, and the retailer is making efforts to appeal to a different youth mentality by removing references to “Ivy League heritage,” making the brand “totally accessible,” and toning down the club-like atmosphere in-store. (BuzzFeed)

Following heartbreaking stories of the death of toddlers forgotten by their parents in hot cars, automakers made claims that they would be working on new technology to help prevent the tragedies. But years later that technology has not been produced, so parents and teens are developing it instead. Independent entrepreneurs are working on a slew of solutions for baby on board tech that would stop hot-car deaths, including car seat sensors, smartphone apps, and low-tech solutions. Many are seeking backing on crowdfunding sites to make their products a reality. (Washington Post)

Ck one was an iconic ‘90s product, but the brand has kept up with the youth market in order to stay relevant with a new generation. The fragrance, celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, relies on social media platforms, including Snapchat andTumblr, to attract Millennials and stay engaged. When creating their latest TV ad, they invited all participating talent to take behind-the-scenes pictures, selfies, and video, which were then used to “seed” the new campaign on social. The Snapchat campaign has “seen more than 1 million views in just a month and a half.” (Mediapost)

Just a few years ago, Hollywood was incredulous that YouTube was anything more than a collection of amateur vloggers, and certainly most didn’t believe that it would change the traditional entertainment world. But now, YouTube has become a “Hollywood hit factory” for teen entertainment. Smaller companies that realized the platform’s potential early have grown massively, big studios are snapping up YouTube studios to get in on the action, and programming is in the midst of  “rapid consolidation.” Our social media trend tracker shows that as of March 2014, YouTube has become the number one platform teens use, with 89% telling us they use the video site compared to 80% who say they use Facebook. (Businessweek)

Earlier this summer, a report that fewer teens were interested in getting summer jobs than ever before had older generations rolling their eyes at the slacker youth who “don’t want to work.” But new research indicates that it might not just be that lazy kids these days want to spend their summers taking selfies: It could be that teen jobs don’t pay off the way they used to. Millennials with summer jobs don’t see the future wage increase that teens in the ‘70s and ‘80s did. (Vox

Every day we deliver Millennial insights to your inbox, but every quarter, we look at some of the larger trends happening within the generation—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, an in-the-know guide to Millennials that synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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