AwesomenessTV Provides Must-See Content For Tweens & Teens

AwesomenessYouth today are turning to the web to watch much of their programming, which is why professional YouTube channels like AwesomenessTV are capturing their attention and proving to be...well, awesome! The channel, which launched in June, has already attracted 12 million views and appeals to 12-17-year-olds who seek short shows that fits their attention span.

Tune in to any of the 15 shows on the newly created YouTube channel and you’ll instantly be immersed in the lives and interests of tweens and teens. Brian Robbins — a veteran of the TV industry who’s directed and produced TV series for youth on Nickelodeon and The CW — was inspired to create the channel as he saw his sons’ viewing habits shift from the small screen to an even smaller one. Knowing that networks have found it challenging to reach tweens in the past few years, he decided to do something about it. So came AwesomenessTV.

IMOThe channel has a wide range of programs from sporting events and game shows to music videos and tween/teen talk shows including the popular program, “IMO” (In My Opinion). The show is a younger version of “The View” hosted by YouTube stars, Twitter prodigies, and actresses on teen TV shows. During each episode, the girls sit on a couch chatting about the latest pop culture news, trends, and topics affecting people their age. Then there’s “Make Me Over,” where teens can request for them or their friends to get style suggestions from the Awesomeness team. Think TLC for teens. Music fans will enjoy “Mindless Takeover” which follows the popular boy band Mindless Behavior, “Kat Graham Road To” featuring “The Vampire Diaries” star on her path to becoming a pop star, and “Greyson Chance Takeover” which shows the singer throughout his world tour.

Sk8 SpotterzBut AwesomenessTV appeals to guys too. “That Was Awesome”…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Master of None represents my generation because it takes the little things (going to a taco place) and expands on how the choices are debilitating.”—Female, 33, MN

We know how many Millennials planned to watch last night’s debates, but how many knew they could watch in virtual reality? VR social network AltspaceVR has created an experience that allows participants to watch live debates virtually, in a VR re-creation of NBC News Democracy Plaza at New York’s Rockefeller Center. At the launch party, attendees, including Al Roker, were represented as avatars and instead of applause, emojis were used to express reactions. AltspaceVR has been working to build a virtual community over the past year and hopes to bring people together during “a bitterly divided campaign” with the new experience. (The Verge

The latest smart toys are getting kids away from screens. Global sales of smart toys are expected to increase from $2.8 billion in 2015 to $11.3 billion by 2020, and according to one expert, synching a toy to a phone or tablet will soon be as common as putting in batteries. To appease parents concerned with screen time, these toys are increasingly about physically interacting with the toy itself, putting apps in the background. One example of the trend is Smarty: an internet-connected personal assistant for kids that answers questions, reminds them to do their homework, streams music and books, and more. (The Guardian

What’s holding back the Millennials from creating more startups? Money. A new study found that 72% of 18-34-year-olds see entrepreneurship as being "essential for new innovation and jobs in our economy," and almost eight in ten see working for a startup “a signal of success”—but only 22% say they would start one of their own. Lack of capital is holding four in ten back from taking the risk—for women and minorities that number is even higher. (Business Insider

Toy brands are constantly competing for kids’ attention, and now that industry drama is coming to the small screen. Amazon is introducing Toy Wars, a drama series based on the rivalry between toy giants Hasbro and Mattel. The show is based on the non-fiction book Toy Wars: The Epic Struggle Between G.I. Joe, Barbie, and the Companies that Make Them, which follows a “free spirit” Hasbro executive who was forced to take over the company when his “marketing genius” brother passed away from AIDS. The series will be co-written by Book Of Mormon star Josh Gad and The O.C. creator Josh Schwartz, whose father helped turned Hasbro into a top toy company. (Deadline

Communal housing is a growing Millennial trend, but it also dates back to the Middle Ages. Co-housing groups have been catching on as young people and families look to share household responsibilities, cut costs, and have a deeper sense of community with others. While it might seem strange in modern times, the instinct is ancient: According to A World of Their Own Making: Myth, Ritual, and the Quest for Family Values, medieval Europe homes were “essentially gathering places for small groups of revolving residents,” where people lived with friends and extended communities. (The Atlantic

Quote of the Day: “Adventure Time is the show that best represents my generation because we like the nostalgic aspect of watching cartoons but we also like off-the-wall plots.” –Male, 21, MI 

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies