Profile Of A Chinese Millennial & Entrepreneur: Chelsea Lu

Having an entrepreneurial spirit and the urge to create one's own company is becoming increasingly characteristic of Millennials all over the world. Regardless of their country or continent, many young people seek to pursue their passions and create a name for themselves. This is the case for Chelsea Lu, a young entrepreneur in China, who after attending college and working in the U.S., moved back to China to create an Internet application. One of our Youth Advisory Board members, Bryan Spencer, interviewed her in the latest installment of his "Profile of a Chinese Millennial" series, highlighting this universal desire among young people to make a difference. 

Profile Of A Chinese Millennial & Entrepreneur: Chelsea Lu

Mark SaysBryan Spencer: So you're a 20-something year old entrepreneur in China. Can you tell me a little about your company? How did you form your company and what were you doing?

Chelsea Lu: I started this company after I quit my last job in digital advertising in the U.S. and came back to China. My sole motivation for quitting my job and coming home was to start my own tech company — the typical "Silicon Valley" style, and by that I mean focusing on building one consumer Internet application. I realize this was a pretty atypical path for a person on the buying side of digital advertising and with no coding experience. However, retrospectively, I think the seed for this adventure was planted during my first summer internship when I was working with a digital media team.

I especially remembered one guy from a startup that does verified code ad coming in for an introduction one afternoon. He was the co-founder of his own company and was VERY passionate about the product. To this day, I can still recall the goosebumps I got listening to him...in a good way.

After…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

New research by Eventbrite claims that one in five Millennials attended a music festival in the past year, and that festivals are “one of young Americans’ favorite pastimes.” The study scanned social media conversations from the last year and found that South by Southwest was the most-discussed festival, and EDM fests made up eight of the top 25 most talked about events. Ypulse’s own bi-weekly survey found that 31% of 14-29-year-olds planned to go to a music festival in 2013. (Quartz)

Millennials have a different approach to buying food than previous generations, and they are changing the way that grocery shopping is done. These foodies are more likely to plan their shopping around a specific recipe they’re planning to cook, to buy ingredients the same day they’re preparing a meal, and look for minimally processed and locally grown food and beverages. Their preferences put pressure on big-box stores and traditional groceries who need to adapt to attract the new generation of shopper. (Washington Post)

We don’t just deliver data. Along with our bi-weekly survey result data files, we provide our Gold subscribers with a topline report that synthesizes hand-picked, illuminating data points and our insights and expertise. Interesting differences between males and females, older and younger Millennials, ethnicities, and more are highlighted, and relevant statistics are streamlined into an easily consumed, concise, visual takeaway. (Ypulse)

Quote of the Day: “I put off/dread calling people in general. Everything should be done online by this time!” –Female, 30, FL 

In a continued effort to draw back the teen consumers they’ve lost, Abercrombie & Fitch’s logo will “be dead” in U.S. stores by 2015. Globally, the Abercrombie and Hollister logos and names will still be used on designs, but will be phased out here where the brand knows it is no longer considered a status symbol. Abercrombie’s sales continue to fall, and the retailer is making efforts to appeal to a different youth mentality by removing references to “Ivy League heritage,” making the brand “totally accessible,” and toning down the club-like atmosphere in-store. (BuzzFeed)

Following heartbreaking stories of the death of toddlers forgotten by their parents in hot cars, automakers made claims that they would be working on new technology to help prevent the tragedies. But years later that technology has not been produced, so parents and teens are developing it instead. Independent entrepreneurs are working on a slew of solutions for baby on board tech that would stop hot-car deaths, including car seat sensors, smartphone apps, and low-tech solutions. Many are seeking backing on crowdfunding sites to make their products a reality. (Washington Post)

Ck one was an iconic ‘90s product, but the brand has kept up with the youth market in order to stay relevant with a new generation. The fragrance, celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, relies on social media platforms, including Snapchat andTumblr, to attract Millennials and stay engaged. When creating their latest TV ad, they invited all participating talent to take behind-the-scenes pictures, selfies, and video, which were then used to “seed” the new campaign on social. The Snapchat campaign has “seen more than 1 million views in just a month and a half.” (Mediapost)

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