Group Dating: The More the Merrier

Hook-up culture among young adults has been getting a lot of (potentially overblown) hype lately, and though some say the digital age has brought about the “death of courtship,” a new movement is beginning to define Millennial date nights. New apps and platforms are using Millennials’ fast paced lives to their advantage, providing instantaneous events and ideas that get them away from trolling online profiles and instead connecting IRL, and some young daters are turning to new services that are ushering users out the door to find their next connection, friend, hook-up, soul mate, or otherwise—with their friends in tow.
 
Group dating is on the rise, with a growing number of services, apps and sites being created to take the awkwardness out of a one-on-one night with a stranger. The trend only makes sense for the group-oriented generation; who view their friends as their safety net and thrive in using the digital world as a tool to foster offline connections. Group dating takes friend connections to a new level by increasing the possibilities for a match and erasing the fear many young people have about blind dates. Some older dating sites like Match.com have been experimenting with offline group “non-dates” to bring users from behind their screens. But services focused on organizing group-dates are catching the attention of more and more single Millennials who are looking for easy, comfortable ways to meet up, and are bypassing the trappings  and troubles of online dating. 

 

Grouper
Ever wished you could bring a wingman on a date? Grouper, a group date site and app that seems to be leading the group date movement, lets you bring two. You are matched with another group of three friends, putting the odds ever in your favor by providing three viable romantic choices at once.…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “If a photo of me went viral, I would feel angry but…maybe I would be a little excited because it went viral, as long as the picture is not bad.” –Female, 16, TN

57% of Millennials ages 18-32 say they plan to get a new job within the next year, according to one of Ypulse’s bi-weekly Millennial surveys, fielded this June. The generation is known for their predilection for moving from job to job, and now some businesses are making “generational training” a part of their management instruction in order to keep these younger workers happy. Giving them a purpose, plenty of time off, global opportunities, and a clear career path plan within the company are all tactics being used to retain them. (Businessweek)

Back to school marketing is starting in full force, and Target is relying heavily on digital to reach college students, in more ways than one. The retailer has launched a campaign employing major YouTube stars, like Tiffany Garcia and Mikey Bolts, to sell apparel, electronics, and furnishings, featuring them in four YouTube shows that make over dorm rooms and offer decorating tips. The video series lives online so that Target can “be part of the ongoing conversation” and “go where the [M]illennial generation is.” (NYTimes)

Millennial-hate is easy to find online, where articles like “Millennials, the Friendly Cutthrout Generation” and “Millennials' Political Views Don't Make Any Sense” seem to appear on a daily basis. But how do Millennials themselves feel about the bad rap they’re getting? One Millennial’s response to some recent Millennial surveys puts things into perspective, wondering if the generation is just more likely to admit things, and whether they “are just like...everybody else?” (Gothamist)

Beyoncé is no stranger to celebrity endorsement, but her latest unexpected marketing trick goes outside the box. This weekend, the powerhouse artist teased a new 50 Shades of Grey trailer by posting a 15-second clip of it on her Instagram with a “darker remix” of her "Crazy in Love" playing as a soundtrack. The teaser was posted with the hashtag #fiftyshades, attracting the attention of both the singer’s fans and the book series’ avid fandom. (MTV)

Rosetta Stone’s new campaign is aimed at Millennials, shifting focus from the product itself to the idea that “people who learn new languages are able to share experiences with people from other places.” The ads will run on more youth-focused channels than Rosetta has appeared on before, like MTV, VH1, and Comedy Central, but the majority of the campaign will be heavily digital and social, and include online webisodes that will air on Vice. (MediaPost)

Did you know that Ypulse tracks social media trends in our biweekly surveys? We found that Vine, Twitter, and YouTube have seen steady growth since November 2013, gaining 7%, 11%, and 12% more Millennial users, respectively. Our Silver and Gold tier subscribers can find helpful visuals that detail our tracked trends in the Data Room on Ypulse.com. (Ypulse)

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