Ypulse Interview: Jake Sasseville, Late Night Republic

jakesassevilleToday’s Ypulse Interview is with Jake Sasseville, 24 year-old host of “Late Night Republic.” Jake first flashed on to the Ypulse radar back in 2008 when his earlier Gen Y riff on late night programming “The Edge with Jake Sasseville” debuted on more than 40 ABC affiliates and he first started turning heads (and winning brands) with his bold personality and equally dynamic approach to product integration. Clearly, we suspected, this was a youth entrepreneur to watch…

And watch they have. Last month, Jake launched his latest late-night project in 75 markets and was profiled by Ad Age, reg. required, for winning out over Leno, Conan and the like as Procter & Gamble’s platform of choice to promote Pringles Xtreme crisps. Below, we catch up with Jake to hear more about this new venture, his winning formula and what it takes to reach Gen Y audiences today.

Ypulse: How did you first get interested in the talk show business? What lessons did you learn starting out?

Jake Sasseville: Well, I actually didn’t start in TV if I’m honest with you. I started out as a magician learning how to influence people, hopefully make them laugh and certainly get a lot of rejection. I got a lot of rejection as a magician… mainly because I used to mess up my tricks a lot. But I started in Maine at 13 years-old and I would go to restaurants and shakedown the owner to hire me for $60 an hour to do walk-around magic while their customers would wait for their food.

So, that’s how it began. And then I realized I wanted to do more than magic and have more impact, so I used that money that I made as a magician to invest in a local access TV show at 14 and 15 years old. That’s how the dream started and I wasn’t really expecting it go anywhere. As time progressed though and I became more interested in working with…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Next winter I will be going on a solo backpacking trip through Southeast Asia and India. I plan to visit ashrams in India, go hiking and kayaking through SE Asia, try new cuisines, meet locals, and get off the beaten path.” – Female, 26, CO

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Emoji are replacing internet slang, infiltrating fashion, and more brands have been creating emoji-centric marketing campaigns in order to appeal to Millennials and teens. Now nonprofit hotline BRIS has launched Abused Emojis, a new emoji alphabet that includes icons for parent drinking, a child being hurt, thinking about death, and other difficult issues. The intention is for kids to use these symbols “to talk about situations where they felt bad or wrongly treated” without having to verbalize their complex problems. (Fast Company)

We give you a dose of insights on young consumers each day, but every quarter, we zoom our lens out to look at some of the larger trends happening with Millennials and teens—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, which synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" of big shifts and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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