Ypulse Interview: Jake Sasseville, Late Night Republic

jakesassevilleToday’s Ypulse Interview is with Jake Sasseville, 24 year-old host of “Late Night Republic.” Jake first flashed on to the Ypulse radar back in 2008 when his earlier Gen Y riff on late night programming “The Edge with Jake Sasseville” debuted on more than 40 ABC affiliates and he first started turning heads (and winning brands) with his bold personality and equally dynamic approach to product integration. Clearly, we suspected, this was a youth entrepreneur to watch…

And watch they have. Last month, Jake launched his latest late-night project in 75 markets and was profiled by Ad Age, reg. required, for winning out over Leno, Conan and the like as Procter & Gamble’s platform of choice to promote Pringles Xtreme crisps. Below, we catch up with Jake to hear more about this new venture, his winning formula and what it takes to reach Gen Y audiences today.

Ypulse: How did you first get interested in the talk show business? What lessons did you learn starting out?

Jake Sasseville: Well, I actually didn’t start in TV if I’m honest with you. I started out as a magician learning how to influence people, hopefully make them laugh and certainly get a lot of rejection. I got a lot of rejection as a magician… mainly because I used to mess up my tricks a lot. But I started in Maine at 13 years-old and I would go to restaurants and shakedown the owner to hire me for $60 an hour to do walk-around magic while their customers would wait for their food.

So, that’s how it began. And then I realized I wanted to do more than magic and have more impact, so I used that money that I made as a magician to invest in a local access TV show at 14 and 15 years old. That’s how the dream started and I wasn’t really expecting it go anywhere. As time progressed though and I became more interested in working with…

 
 

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