Ypulse Essentials: Young Enterpreneurs, F.C.C. Presents 'Generation Mobile', JWOWW Rewrites 'The Rules'

youngentrepreneursCatering to young entrepreneurs (has become quite a cottage industry… for young entrepreneurs. At least that’s what strikes me in the latest update on recent grads starting their own businesses, which includes quotes from past Ypulse Interviewees Intern Queen Lauren Berger and HerCampus.com founder Stephanie Kaplan) (New York Times, reg. required)

- F.C.C. presents ‘Generation Mobile’ (An upcoming forum on teens and technology where experts will “address risks associated with heavy technology use among young people”  focusing on balance and context over regulation. Definitely curious to hear the thinking that comes out of this) (New York Times, reg. required)

- Chatroulette, Justin Bieber and iPad (were the top Google searches of 2010. And in other year-end ranking news, Ke$ha is named Billboard’s top “hot 100” artist and top “new artist” of the year) (Los Angeles Times)

- Obama to sign Child Nutrition Bill (that would expand free school meals for the needy and give government the power to decide what kinds of foods go into vending machines, cafeterias and fundraisers during school hours) (New York Times, reg. required)

- ‘Chronicles Of Narnia’ tops the box office (with $24.5 million in sales its opening weekend. Though, as MTV notes, given the film’s $155 million production budget, the standing is a slightly bittersweet victory. Plus, more on the social media marketing power Disney is putting behind “Tron”) (MTV News) (Social Times)

- Mr Youth launches Youth4Youth (In lieu of holiday gifts this season, the youth marketing agency is asking for donations towards a special fundraising initiative benefiting youth)

- JWOWW rewrites ‘The Rules’ (in an updated version of the advice book for young women due out next February. Also, Scholastic announces plans to relaunch the first five…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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