Ypulse Essentials: Twilight Prom Dresses, Teens' Internet Activity, Walmart Wants Cord Cutters

Although there’s only one movie left in ‘The Twilight Saga’ (hysteria for the franchise isn’t going away anytime soon. Need proof? Just take a look at the line of prom dresses created by Alfred Angelo, the designer of Bella’s wedding dress in “Breaking Dawn: Part 1.” Now teens can have a night as magical as Bella’s prom by wearing dark, romantic, and glamorous gowns. We guess it’s better than Twilight fans faking engagements to try on Bella’s wedding dress. At least they can have outfits that are a little more age-appropriate. In other fashion news, Jessica Simpson and her sister Ashlee have officially launched their tween collection aptly called Jessica Simpson Girls featuring edgy and playful clothes, and it’s in stores just in time for the holidays!) (Seventeen) (TMZ) (MTV)

- Almost all teens are active on the Internet (but recent Pew Research reveals that older teens are much more attached to the Web than younger ones. Fully 53% of 14-17 year olds go online several times a day, while 30% of 12-13 year olds only go online once a day. But a surprising 24% of teens only go online weekly. We were also shocked to learn that only 5% of Americans use location-based apps like Foursquare. Checking in isn’t as popular as it has been despite the opportunity it provides to receive deals or show off your status to your friends. But even though such services aren’t very popular, Google+ is launching a check-in service and we doubt this will make the social network more appealing) (AdAge) (TechCrunch)

- As Millennials continue to cut the cord on cable or at least reduce their TV bill (Walmart strives to attract this market with its Vudu service. The discount empire is encouraging the creators of the video-streaming devices it sells to include Vudu’s service, and it’s…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite app is Snapchat, because it offers quick messaging with a time limit that ensures privacy while being highly entertaining.”—Female, 20, FL 

If you want to know what teens are doing online, don’t ask their parents. A survey by the National Cyber Security Alliance found that 60% of 13-17-year-olds have a secret online account they say their parents know nothing about, while only 27% of parents suspect their kids have one. This statistic will likely worry parents who are increasingly monitoring online behavior. About 67% of parents say they have a rule in place for kids to be open with them about any “sort of uncomfortable or scary incidents that occur online,” however only 32% of teens surveyed say that such a rule exists in their household. (CNET)

Millennials around the are not only passionate about global issues, but ready to take them on. A World Economic Forum survey found that seven in ten 18-35-year-olds see abundant opportunities for themselves and their peers to tackle global issues, and half believe they have decision making power in their home countries. When the WEF asked about the three most serious issues affecting the world today, Millennials had the same response as the year before: religious conflicts came in third with 33.8% of responses, large scale conflict and wars came in second with 38.5% of responses, and climate change and destruction of natural resources was the top response with 45.2% of respondents. (Business Insider)

Outlet malls are thriving, and it’s all thanks to men and thrifty Millennials. According to Cowen & Co.’s latest Consumer Tracker Survey, outlet visitation by 18-34-year-old men reached a new peak of 44% in July, most likely due to male preference for brand stores over department retailers. Overall Millennial visitation is also up: on average, 31% of 18-34-year-old women and 35% of 18-34-year-old men say they visited an outlet mall every month between December 2012 and July 2016. An analyst of NPD Group attributes the trend to frugal Millennials who would rather save their cash for experiences. (MarketWatch

Teenage girls with depression or anxiety “are less alone than ever.” The Department of Education has revealed that these mental illnesses are a slowly growing epidemic among teen girls in England: about one third report having depression or anxiety, a 10% increase over the last decade. Social media pressure, bullying, and unrealistic body expectations are all cited as factors, which have especially effected young girls all over the world. In America, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reports that teen girls are three times more likely to be depressed than their male counterparts. (Teen Vogue)

Instagram has made connecting with consumers even easier for brands. The platform’s new “contact” button allows users to call, text, or email brands through their profiles. According to a social media specialist, “social…is a brand’s first line of defense—both for reputation management and customer service,” and the new button eliminates the hassle of having to respond to each individual comment. Brands like Nordstrom, Delta, and Denny’s are already utilizing the new feature. (Digiday

Quote of the Day: “My favorite app is Pokémon Go, because it's kinda a big deal for those of us who've been dreaming about it for over a decade.”—Female, 21, NJ 

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