Ypulse Essentials: 'Twilight' Dolls, Potter Fever, Elle Magazine On Stardoll

twilightdolls Bittersweet news for Twihards (Bella and Edward dolls are on their way, but won’t be out until spring 2009. Also Entertainment Weekly asks whether a male director could fill Catherine Hardwicke’s shoes for the sequel?) (Trendhunter)

- Britney’s comeback is official (with her fifth album “Circus” debuting at #1 on the charts and selling more than 500,000 copies. Plus Tokio Hotel accused of pulling an Ashlee Simpson) (MTV News) (Idolator)

- Global youth marketing and coffee (an interesting discussion from MobileYouth’s Graham Brown)

- Grey’s Parody (on WB.com. A pretty funny send up of the primetime soap, even if you’re unfamiliar with the series) (ReelPop)

- No cure for Potter fever (a decade later and the boy wizard still has that special something. Also from the other end of the spectrum musings on why boys don’t read) (SignOnSanDiego.com)  (SLJ)

- Flirting with phones (further discussion on how teens use mobile technology to explore their sexuality) (USA Today)

- Shaming kids into healthy habits? (an ad campaign against obesity in Switzerland that just makes you want to shake your head. Meanwhile Axe helps college kids get home for the holidays on the East Coast. Also a site that gathers useful info for marketers on student discounts) (Gawker) (MediaPost, reg. required)

- More on cyberbullying (a high school student sues after she’s penalized for creating a derisive Facebook group targeting a teacher) (Wired)

- Stardoll and Elle team up (the fashion mag gets into the paper doll avatar game. Plus Habbo announces a dual economy in its virtual world for teens) (WSJ)

- Gen Y’s growing anxiety (about the job market today. Plus a Y-er speaks out about her trouble breaking into the tech industry after college) (Zandland Blog) (Silicon Alley Insider)

PS Check out the latest vlog on…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies