Ypulse Essentials: 'The Simpsons' Gets Renewed, Qwikster Calls It Quitster, VH1 Revamped

The fight between ‘The Simpsons’ cast and Fox is finally over (after a long pay dispute that threatened to cancel the show. Viewers will enjoy two more seasons of the longest-running TV sitcom! Millennials are grateful for this decision — Ypulse research found that 43% of students were sad about the possibility that the show would end after 23 seasons, including 52% of guys) (NY Mag)

- Netflix has reversed its decision (to split its services into two separate companies — one for streaming under its original name and a DVD-by-mail service called Qwikster. However, Netflix has abandoned Qwikster before it even started since it realizes this would make things “more difficult” for users. Clearly the company listened to customers’ numerous complaints! Yet we wonder what Millennials will think of Netflix after it caused so much confusion) (Mashable)

- VH1 is growing up and reshaping itself (as a network for 25-34 year olds, which it refers to as “adultsters.” Hmmm, they might want to rethink that name… To grab this audience, VH1 is unveiling new programming next year such as “Aptitude Test,” which determines what jobs celebrities would have if they weren’t famous, and a reality show about rapper T.I. There’s also “House of Consignment” about selling designer duds on eBay, which is of course relevant in today’s digital-savvy society. But like many networks, VH1 is also using 90s nostalgia to hook its audience, with revamps of “Pop Up Video” and “Behind The Music”) (Adweek) (Marketwatch)

- Millennials always want to have the latest gadgets (so we’re not surprised that over 1 million people pre-ordered the iPhone 4S in 24 hours. It may only be a refresh of the phone, not a complete new one as many hoped for, but clearly nothing can keep customers away from Apple devices. Speaking of…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “There are so many places I would love to go! I’ve never been to Greece. I would like to go with some close friends and just take in the local culture and food and relax.” –Female, 30, IN

According to Ypulse’s May monthly survey, 41% of 13-32-year-olds regularly use Spotify to listen to music. But the app wants to be their one-stop-entertainment shop, and has just added video and podcasts to the platform. Media partners, including Slate, BBC, Conde Nast, and Adult Swim, will offer clips of video content to be streamed by users. The move puts Spotify in the ranks of other social platforms “determined to become everything to everyone.” (TechCrunchWired)

While some social media giants (Facebook, Snapchat, and now Spotify) want to be young consumers' portal for all media, others are becoming more and more focused on single functions. New apps Catchpool and This. (with a period) allow users to post only one thing each day, pushing only “high-quality content” into feeds. The approach gets rid of overwhelming social clutter in favor of those things users are most passionate about. (Fast Company)

Pizza Hut is the latest brand to use selfies in marketing—but they’re taking a slightly different approach. Their new two foot pizzas are too big to be captured in a regular selfie, so the chain has created a selfie stick parody PSA, warning against the “dangers of selfie stick abuse.” Branding in the video is purposefully secondary to the entertainment, but the spot does walk a fine line between winkingly acknowledging customers’ behavior, and making fun of them for it. (Adweek)

We’ve told you that Millennials are embracing wine, and that big beer is struggling to win over the new generation of drinkers. Morgan Stanley Research has found the number of Millennials who say beer is their favorite alcoholic drink actually fell over 5% since 2012. In response, we’ve seen beer brands roll out new products, flavors, and campaigns attempting to provide new exciting beverage options for these potential industry killers. (Business Insider)

American Eagle is hoping their new label will help them to win back teens. The brand, Don’t Ask Why, follows the recently popular trends of “soft dressing, restricted sizing, [and] a California aesthetic.” Those qualities make it very similar to the Brandy Melville brand, which has had a lot of success with young female shoppers. Don’t Ask Why is being used to test and experiment with concepts that could be applied to AE products if successful. (Racked)

What if you could collect all the young consumer insights, data, and news most relevant to you in one easily accessed spot? Oh wait, you can! On Ypulse.com, Bronze, Silver and Gold subscribers can click on the star icons next to any insight article or news feed item to immediately store them in the Library tab, creating a repository of relevant information—curated by you. (Ypulse)

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