Ypulse Essentials: 'The Lorax' Sets Box Office Records, Understanding Millennials' Language, 'The Real Housewives of Disney' Spoof

Dr. Seuss’ ‘The Lorax’ nabbed the top spot at the box office this weekend (garnering $70.7 million — the best opening of the year so far — and becoming the best debut ever for a non-sequel animated film! Although the movie didn’t get the best reviews from critics and has been under fire for questionable commercial tie-ins — a car company, really? — the LA Times offers insight into what makes this and other animated flicks successful. The teen comedy “Project X” was the second highest performer this weekend and exemplifies the growing trend of “found footage films”. In other movie news, Tim Burton is remaking his ‘80s work “Frankenweenie” as a stop-motion animated film, but we’re not sure the update will be as good) (EW) (Crushable)

- Want to understand Millennials? Then you have to speak their language (according to a recent MTV study aptly titled “What Millennials Are Just Sayin.’” Along with incorporating words from digital culture into their everyday vocab, today’s youth want to be witty, original, and optimistic when they speak) (Broadcasting Cable)

- Lindsay Lohan brought in huge ratings while hosting ‘SNL’ this weekend, making it the second best performing show this season (despite mixed reviews. People may have tuned in hoping for a train wreck, but there were a few genuinely funny highlights, including “The Real Housewives of Disney” skit in which Lindsay, Kristin Wiig, and the gang dressed up as princesses and proved to be anything but enchanting — yet entirely entertaining. Talk about some animated drama!) (Mashable)

- Speaking of clips that have us LOLing, check out the preview for the ‘Punk’d’ revival (in which Justin Bieber tricks Taylor Swift into thinking she ruined a wedding. If this short clip is any indication, this…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

“The issue I am most passionate about is jobs/unemployment, because I need a job.”

—Female, 24, OH

Half of all 13-17-year-olds are on Snapchat, according to Ypulse’s most recent social media tracker—so what are they really doing on there? One BuzzFeed writer observed his 13-year-old sister to find out how to “Snapchat like the teens,” and learned that the “app is [her] life.” She wakes up every morning to respond to about 40 incoming snaps with selfies, which she can do in under a minute. Responding is crucial, streaks (responding every day without a break) are “the MOST important thing,” filters are “VERY big,” and “EVERYONE looks at Cosmo on Discover.” When asked about her dad’s reaction to her incessant snapping she answered: “Parents don’t understand. It’s about being there in the moment.” (BuzzFeed

The Tab, a student-targeted site with articles on campus life and local stories, is not ready to let go of their 2.5 million monthly readers preparing to graduate—so they’ve expanded. The Tab National is targeting for 20-somethings, and describes itself as as “the Vice for people who don’t think that Uber or pop-up markets are necessarily a bad thing.” The Tab’s top-tier U.S. and U.K. university sites have captivated advertisers, who are guaranteed that their sponsored posts will get at least 25,000 page views—more than half of brand stories on the site are getting 50,000. (Digiday

You may have heard that Twitter is reworking their timeline algorithm, but what does that mean for brands? The new layout will use an algorithm to showcase the most relevant tweets, and “collated tweets from brands, athletes, politicians and other public figures will appear at the top of the timeline” so users won’t miss any trending conversations. For brands this means well-thought out content will still be key as “[t]he algorithm will likely favor content with higher engagement.” It could also mean more exposure: “organic posts [will] have the ability to drive enormous engagement and cause a buzz.” (The Drum

According to Pew’s new data, Millennial Democrats are far more likely than older generations and their Republican peers to get their political updates through social media, with 74% who are very likely going to participate in their state’s primary or caucus saying they learned about the election through a social site, compared to 50% of Millennial Republicans. Millennial Democrats are also the most likely to identify themselves as liberal: in 2015, half (49%) labeled themselves as liberals, compared to 41% of Gen X, 40%(of Boomer, and 35% of Silent Democrats. (Pew Research Center)

Luxury menswear brand John Varavatos’s shoppable, touchable video ad powered by Cinematique prompted eight times more Facebook engagement than standard videos. Viewers can click or tap clothing like as the video plays, and at the end of the ad are shown the collection they chose, leading to product pages on the website. According to recent data, 33% of fashion video are considered mainly “brand-building,” and only 16% of brands use shoppable videos. But that could shift as more marketers adjust to consumers’ video-consumption behaviors. (WWDDigiday)

Quote of the Day: “I participated in Bikram Yoga, because I found a few YouTube tutorials on it.” –Female, 24, MN

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