Ypulse Essentials: 'The Fashion Star' Is Packed With Celebrities, SpongeBob SquarePants Twitter Event, Introducing Paramount Animation

The Fashion StarStyle icon Nicole Richie and menswear designer John Varvatos joined NBC’s ‘The Fashion Star’ (as celebrity mentors and judges in the upcoming style show, where aspiring designers compete for a multimillion-dollar contract to launch their own label. Between the slew of stars — which also includes Jessica Simpson and host Elle Macpherson — and the chance for viewers to purchase contestants’ creations after each episode, “The Fashion Star” is shaping up to be one of the coolest shows yet. Speaking of celebrities, Hewlett-Packard enlisted several young stars to market their TouchPad to young consumers. Russell Brand, “Glee”’s Lea Michele, and “iCarly”’s Miranda Cosgrove are all featured in commercials, and watch for spots with Jay-Z and LeBron James coming soon. Someone in that diverse group is bound to spark Millennials’ interest!) (Entertainment Weekly) (NYTimes, reg required)

- SpongeBob SquarePants is taking over Twitter next week (with the release of a special storyline available exclusively on Twitter. The “episode” is called “The Ice Race Cometh: A Twitter-Tale” and it will run from Tuesday July 12th to Friday July 15th. Each day fans will receive part of the story via tweets and images. This Twitter-event will lead up to a new SpongeBob TV episode called “Frozen Face Off,” which will premiere on Friday July 15th at 8pm. What do you think of this marketing strategy of content built around social media and followers for such a young audience?) (Cynopsis)

- Expect some pretty impressive animated movies from Paramount (since they’ve created an in-house animation division appropriately called Paramount Animation. They’ll focus on CGI-animated movies with budgets of $100 million per film. Their first movie will be released in 2014 and we can hardly…

 
 

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Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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