Ypulse Essentials: Speidi Dolls, 'Digital Cribs,' Millennials Want More TV

Jordin SparksJordin Sparks wishes she would have ‘worded it differently’ (after calling all teen girls who aren’t virgins “sluts” at the VMAs. Plus Heidi and Spencer dolls? Say it isn’t so.) (Entertainment Weekly) (Reality Blurred)

- Cisco ‘borrows’ from MTV (with its new branded webisode series “Digital Cribs”) (Reel Pop)

- Millennials want more of the “telly” (on more devices according to a Motorola survey of youth in Europe and the middle east. Plus highlights from Youth Trends latest top 10 report, guys love “Entourage,” girls love “Grey’s,” that sort of thing)

- InStyle (will be in “Gossip Girl” a lot. Plus vintage clothes all the rage in…China) (WWD)

- The is the ‘self-documentation generation’ (As a result we are seeing drug culture, which used to happen out of sight, documented online like these pot and salvia videos. And according to WebMD, the new teen over-the-counter drug is Snurf pills) (Boston Herald) (L.A. Times, reg. required) (Gawker)

- Microsoft wants kids to have digital i.d.s (for age verification. Plus kids love streaming videos on Disney.com) (Internet News via Izzy Neis) (Variety)

- Speaking of Disney… (they are building a huge youth sports compound in “The Magic Kingdom”) (USA Today)

- Pop Candy’s top teen movies (Whitney continues her list making awesomeness)

P.S. I loved “Privileged” last night. Better than GG or the new “90210” IMHO.

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Video game soundtracks have been present throughout my life.” –Male, 32, IN 

Snapchat says that 60% of American youth are users of their platform, and they have some major plans for the future. (Note: Ypulse’s most recent social media tracker actually found that 40% of 13-32-year-olds and 52% of 13-17-year-olds use the app.) Twenty-four-year-old CEO Evan Spiegel believes that teens and Millennials will make Snapchat the future of media, and mobile content will replace traditional TV. (The VergeBloomberg)

A recently discovered Google patent hints that the tech giant could one day create toys that can react to children’s voices, and record what they say. The digital/cuddly playthings could also physically respond to information with head tilts and different expressions. Some are calling the concept “creepy,” but our top toy trends of 2015 included several products that monitor and have conversations with children, including the new Hello Barbie. (Campaign)

The debate around cell phones in classrooms continues, and new research is weighing on the side of teachers and parents who want them banned. A working paper suggests that removing cell phones from schools results in an increase in academic performance, especially amongst the lowest-performing students. New York City Mayor DeBlasio recently lifted the cellphone ban in schools, in part because children were paying local adults to store their phones each day. (NYMag)

We’ve told brands about the importance of marketing on visual platforms, and those who do should take note: filtered photos are significantly more liked than #nofilter shots. A recent study found that filtered photos are 45% more likely to be commented on, and that people prefer high contrast, warm temperature filters. Filter judgment from more serious photographers is also fading as mobile has become the most ubiquitous picture-taking method. (Wired)

The Millennial Trains project is making its third voyage, carrying innovative members of the generation on a rail tour across the U.S. The participants are young entrepreneurs who share their ideas on how to change the world along the ride, which includes meetups, interviews, and other experiences to help them develop their concepts. This group includes a doctoral student studying nutritional programs for obese children, and a postdoc working on a project to keep the elderly more safe. (Fast Company)

We don’t just deliver data. Along with our monthly survey data, we provide our Gold subscribers with a topline report that synthesizes hand-picked, illuminating data points and our insights and expertise. Interesting differences between males and females, older and younger Millennials, ethnicities, and more are highlighted, and relevant statistics are streamlined into an easily consumed, concise, visual takeaway. (Ypulse)

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