Ypulse Essentials: Shopping With Social Media, Kindle Fire Steals Market Share, Teens Take On Twitter

PinterestPinterest is growing rapidly and has quickly become the #5 social network (in terms of driving retail traffic, behind Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Yahoo!, and ahead of Google+. It makes sense considering the site’s large female following and the clever way it allows users to display items for sale. Speaking of shopping, half of Millennials are more trusting of recommendations from strangers than they are of those from friends and family. They believe that user reviews posted online represent a more honest and genuine opinion. Some savvy retailers are experimenting with how they can use this to their advantage; for example, Urban Outfitters is using photos of outfits submitted by customers in its marketing) (SocialTimes) (Portfolio)

- The holidays made a big difference in the tablet market (thanks to the Kindle Fire’s introduction in November. It’s quickly taken a huge share of market from the Samsung Galaxy Tab. Even more likely to raise eyebrows: the Fire drives 2.5 times as many paid downloads as the Galaxy Tab) (Giga Om)

- The teen Twitter-verse has been steadily growing (as more and more young people flock to the network. They’re finding that Facebook is crowded with their parents, grandparents, brands, and just about every other person they know, and are using Twitter as a sort of filter to connect with their friends away from the prying eyes of their family. Twitter also gives them some anonymity because it doesn’t require real names. They’re not leaving Facebook just yet, but they’re making more use of other social networks) (HuffPo) (ReadWriteWeb)

- There’s no denying Millennials’ influence on culture (even foodie culture. Their heightened interest in ecological issues is pushing the “ethical eating” trend; their global awareness and cultural diversity leads them into the…

 
 

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“[Anna Victoria is] a good role model to women and is changing the way the world looks at fitness and body image.”—Female, 21, CA

Abercrombie & Fitch is going gender-neutral for their new kids’ clothing line. The “Everybody Collection” features “tops, bottoms, and accessories” for five-14-year-old boys and girls. A&F’s Brand President explained their decision to appeal to The Genreless Generation: "Parents and their kids don’t want to be confined to specific colors and styles, depending on whether shopping for a boy or a girl.'' The line of 25 new styles will be rolling out online and to 70 stores, starting this month. (Today)

Millennials & Gen Z already think the Nintendo Switch is cool, and now the brand is giving them more ways to use it. They’re introducing Nintendo Labo, “cardboard-based, interactive DIY experiences” for the Switch, tapping into the “toys-to-life” trend. The variety kit lets players construct five different “Toy-Con” experiences that include turning the Joy-Con controller into a motorbike handle complete with a throttle that can be twisted to accelerate, and creating a piano that senses which keys are pressed to produce the correct musical note. (Kidscreen)

YouTube is pulling Tide Pod Challenge videos from its platform. Teens started eating Tide pods when memes showcasing their Gusher-like colors went viral. The brand has since issued warnings not to eat the pods, and some stores have even begun locking up the product. YouTube has explained the decision to take down the popular pod-eating videos as a continuation of their policy to “prohibit content that’s intended to encourage dangerous activities that have an inherent risk of physical harm." Some are suggesting that pressure from parent company Procter & Gamble may have also been a factor. (Mashable)

The streaming wars are continuing, but audiences are turning to Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime for very different kinds of content. Hub Entertainment Research found original content is winning users' time on Netflix, while over half watch Hulu for its syndicated collection, and movies are most popular on Amazon Prime. The study also found that most Americans overall spend their entertainment time watching TV (40%), but 18-24-year-olds are most likely to engage with gaming and online video, like YouTube. (Quartz)

Outdoor Voices embraced Millennials’ minimal moment to break onto the athleisure scene. The brandless brand goes for a minimalist aesthetic with pops of color, and sees itself as an anti-Nike of sorts. The founder explains that they’re “a recreational Nike” because “With Nike and so many other brands, it’s really about being an expert, being the best. With OV, it’s about how you stay healthy—and happy.” Whatever they’re doing, it’s working: the company has grown rapidly since it was founded in 2013, climbing a startling 800% in 2016 alone. (Vogue)

“I saw some heartbreaking stories in the internet, and decided to look up some international charities and donate to them.”—Male, 20, WA

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