Ypulse Essentials: RIP Microsoft KIN, Facebook Fatigue, CW Jump Starts Fall Lineup

kinWhat killed the KIN (Price points? Botched marketing? Functionality issues? Wired says all of the above led to the demise of the social networking phone, which Microsoft says will not launch in Europe as planned as part of a new strategy to focus on the Windows 7 phone. More post-mortem analysis on Ad Age, reg. required. Meanwhile Apple makes meeting Millennial mobile needs look easy, adding a second camera lens for self-portraits to the new iPhone) (ars technica) (New York Times, reg. required)

- Madonna’s daughter turns fashion blogger (to promote the Material Girl line for Macy’s. But is it ‘4 realz’? Gawker says the “tween LOLz patois.. is so rampant it must be fake.” And speaking of the commodification of youth culture, check out this essay on the new-model teen from PopMatters)

- MTV inks deal with Warner Music Group (for exclusive rights to ads around the music videos of thousands of Warner artists. Also Doug Akin of Mr. Youth reports back from the Bonnaroo music festival with lessons on what makes event sponsorship ‘epic’) (Clickz) (MediaPost, reg. required)

- One in five teens show signs of ‘Facebook Fatigue’ (A survey of 600 teens from online gaming site Roiworld show more signs of waning interest. Look for what our own Ypulse Research has to say on this coming soon) (Mashable)

- Mountain Dew taps skate shops (for a chance to have their designs featured on limited-edition packaging and posted on GreenLabelArt.com. And Seth Green teams with Nintendo to appear in new ads for “Dragon Quest IX: Sentinels of the Starry Skies”) (MediaPost, reg. required)

- CW gets a head start on fall programming (debuting most of its lineup more than a week ahead other networks. And over on Salon, day pass required, tough questions for “Real World” creator Jonathan Murray on returning to New…


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The Newsfeed

"I play [games] constantly until 4 in the morning. When I’m not on my game I’m checking my phone. And the whole time I’m doing all of that my desktop is on the internet.”—Male, 22, OH

Twitch is airing every episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, in celebration of the late Fred Rogers’ 90th birthday and the show’s 50th anniversary. The esports streaming service is expanding to nostalgia entertainment (which young viewers can’t get enough of), but they have a unique twist. The show will be available for co-viewing, with popular Twitch streamers chiming in from time to time. (Mashable)

Over one-third of 18-34-year-olds have stopped using a brand after hearing negative news about them, more than any other generation. Among the brands that most consumers said they gave up on were Wells Fargo, Target, Papa John’s, and Uber. However, Critical Mix and kNOW also found that young consumers are more willing to forgive a brand for bad press: While only 30% of consumers overall would use a brand again after a scandal, 41% of 25-34-year-olds would. (MediaPost)

Alamo Drafthouse is bringing back VHS—offering free rentals for Millennials that wax nostalgic for analog products. Their first store, Video Vortex, is opening in North Carolina. Not only are they “fostering a movie-loving community” with the extensive gratis collection of 75,000 titles, but they’re making money off of the added “beer, food, and merchandise.” No VHS player? No problem. They’re renting those as well. (BoingBoingEW)

Researchers were surprised to find Gen Z students were “relieved” to ditch their smartphones for a few weeks. Screen Education’s study of 62 12-16-year-olds found that 92% thought “it was beneficial” to disconnect from their smartphones while they were at camp. And even though 41% admitted they felt frustrated at times, 35% were able to cut down their use after camp and 17% convinced a friend to curb their time spent on smartphones, too. (PR Newswire)

Beauty brands love augmented reality, but an app can’t replace in-store experience. Not only did Ypulse found time and again that young consumers expect Experiencification and flock to marketing activations (like pop-ups), but brick-and-mortar locations build loyalty. People think they’re scamming Sephora when they re-do their makeup gratis, but that time-spent-in-store is really “turning the ‘scammers’ into buyers.” (Quartzy)

"I love my smart phone. It is just like my best friend [and] I just can't do without my smartphone...”—Male, 27, CA

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