Ypulse Essentials: Nintendo's Network, Few Tweens Wear Sunscreen, Ferris Bueller Is Back

Gamers rejoice! Nintendo is finally launching a digital network for the 3DS and Wii U (which sounds similar to Xbox Live and PlayStation’s Network in that users can have a personal account to connect with other services, participate in competitions, and interact with other players. It’s about time Nintendo! In other gaming news, board games may seem obsolete, but they’re making a comeback as they get a digital update online, via apps, or in video game form. Who’s ready for game night?) (USA Today) (Fast Company)

- We’re a little alarmed that only a quarter of tweens wear sunscreen regularly (according to a new study from Stephen Dusza, a researcher at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in NYC. What’s more, sunscreen use declines sharply from fifth to eighth grade while interest in tanning — particularly among girls — rises. In fact, 40% of eighth graders associate “getting color” with being healthy. Maybe it’s time to stop watching “Jersey Shore” and start learning more about skincare!) (CBS News)

- With the Superbowl quickly approaching, the Internet has been buzzing about the ads we’ll soon see (many of which are Millennial centric, especially Matthew Broderick’s highly-anticipated commercial in which he’ll reprise his role as Ferris Bueller! We’re not sure what he’ll be sponsoring, but the teaser clip has already gone viral. If Bueller isn’t your thing, check out this comical ad for Audi playing on the vampire obsessed culture we live in; seriously, the cars’ headlights are a vampire slayer! But the cutest campaign of all is Coca-Cola’s where its infamous polar bears will react to the game and ads in real time. They’ll chill on their snowfa watching the game and provide commentary via TV ads, Facebook, Twitter, and on

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“Art is basically my job and I enjoy it so much.”—Female, 15, MD

Snap is making its “biggest move” in scripted original content, teaming up with NBCUniversal and the Duplass brothers for their next series. The Duplass-owned creative studio Donut will produce original series for Snap shot in vertical video. NBCU and Snap will also be opening a joint digital content studio focused completely on mobile-first entertainment, “formaliz[ing] their partnership” and putting Snap firmly in the producing/original content creation camp. Snap’s mobile-only approach is part of a movement to shake up how we view videos—in fact, they’re calling their offering “a fundamentally new medium.” (THRTechCrunch)

Eggo frozen waffles are capitalizing on their unexpected Stranger Things’ fame. The brand has seized the marketing opportunity of being a part of one of Millennials & Gen Z’s favorite shows, tying themselves into Netflix’s Super Bowl ad, creating a special toaster for select fans, and swarming New York Comic Con with people dressed up like Eleven armed with “watch party kits” (aka “waffles and a microwavable syrup server”). To prep for the premiere of season two of the show, Eggo is sending out a fully-loaded food truck for the red carpet premiere, and going all out on social media to connect with fans. (MediaPost)

More teens than ever have severe anxiety, but why? The American College Health Association found a 12% increase in undergrads reporting “overwhelming anxiety” from 2011 to 2016, and several studies concur that “there’s just been a steady increase of severely anxious students.” Social media is part of the problem—constant like-monitoring and cyber bullying isn’t helping the most stressed generation to date. There’s also an increasing (and constant) perceived need to over-achieve. One psychology professor observes, “There’s always one more activity, one more A.P. class, one more thing to do in order to get into a top college.” (NYTimes)

Ypulse research has shown that 88% of Millennial parents are trying to avoid helicopter parenting—but they might not be able to help it. The constant media storm of global atrocities and everyday stories of parenting gone wrong combined with advertisers’ willingness to fear-monger, results in a generation of (understandably) anxious parents. It doesn’t help that the tech to constantly monitor kids is easily available (albeit pricey)—from drone surveillance meant for the military to devices that track “blood-oxygen levels all night long.” One relationship therapist sums up, “Everyone is having a hard time drawing a line and just figuring out what’s reasonable versus what’s over-protective.” (Refinery29)

Brands are turning college students into mini-sales forces. Aerie, Victoria’s Secret Pink, and Express are just a few of the many brands that have a program for college campus reps where students receive swag, experience, and other perks for helping bring brand awareness to their colleges. Though brands don’t always require social posts, most ambassadors do share their swag on social, bringing organic ads to their friends’ feeds. The biggest draw is that social posts from reps “[come] across as natural, authentic, a product that they would normally use or want to talk about.” (Racked)

“[Celebrity] can mean anything nowadays and it's a rather diluted term; from YouTube star, to someone on Instagram with millions of followers, to reality TV dopes, etc.”—Male, 30, WI

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