Ypulse Essentials: Nintendo's Network, Few Tweens Wear Sunscreen, Ferris Bueller Is Back

Gamers rejoice! Nintendo is finally launching a digital network for the 3DS and Wii U (which sounds similar to Xbox Live and PlayStation’s Network in that users can have a personal account to connect with other services, participate in competitions, and interact with other players. It’s about time Nintendo! In other gaming news, board games may seem obsolete, but they’re making a comeback as they get a digital update online, via apps, or in video game form. Who’s ready for game night?) (USA Today) (Fast Company)

- We’re a little alarmed that only a quarter of tweens wear sunscreen regularly (according to a new study from Stephen Dusza, a researcher at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in NYC. What’s more, sunscreen use declines sharply from fifth to eighth grade while interest in tanning — particularly among girls — rises. In fact, 40% of eighth graders associate “getting color” with being healthy. Maybe it’s time to stop watching “Jersey Shore” and start learning more about skincare!) (CBS News)

- With the Superbowl quickly approaching, the Internet has been buzzing about the ads we’ll soon see (many of which are Millennial centric, especially Matthew Broderick’s highly-anticipated commercial in which he’ll reprise his role as Ferris Bueller! We’re not sure what he’ll be sponsoring, but the teaser clip has already gone viral. If Bueller isn’t your thing, check out this comical ad for Audi playing on the vampire obsessed culture we live in; seriously, the cars’ headlights are a vampire slayer! But the cutest campaign of all is Coca-Cola’s where its infamous polar bears will react to the game and ads in real time. They’ll chill on their snowfa watching the game and provide commentary via TV ads, Facebook, Twitter, and on

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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