Ypulse Essentials: Lady Gaga's Social Network, The Tween Dating Scene, Social Entrepreneurialism

LittleMonsters.comAs if we need more social networks to follow, Lady Gaga (has just unveiled LittleMonsters.com her very own social site that’s all about her and her fans. If you haven’t received your invite yet, here’s a tour to fill you in on what you’re missing…or not. The site definitely has a very Pinterest-like feel that is pervading current Web design. So what do you think, does Gaga’s net have a chance?) (Hypable) (Mashable)

- The tween dating scene — yes, there is one — is less about seeing each other face to face (and more about talking online and via text. Even if they go to the same school, they might talk for five minutes in the hallways, but trade hundreds of text messages day and night. When they do go out together, it’s usually with groups of friends) (WSJ, reg required)

- We hear the word ‘entrepreneur’ used nearly as often as ‘entitiled’ (to describe the Millennial generation. And with their values of social and global responsibility, they’re using their entrepreneurial skills for good. And it’s not just older Millennials who are getting involved; teens are doing their part too, leveraging their social media and technology skills) (HuffPo) (Differences)

- Millennials who are members of Amazon Prime (will soon have access to shows from many of their favorite networks, including MTV, Nickeodeon, Spike, and more, thanks to a new deal between the online retailer and Viacom. Viacom, which owns Paramount, is also giving Prime members access to movies, which makes Amazon’s collection of streaming content quite impressive...but is it enough to lure Netflix users?) (Publishers Weekly) (Reuters)

- Barbie is opening the sparkly pink doors to her dream closet (just in time for Toy Fair and Fashion Week. The expansive “closet” features several fashion vignettes and augmented reality mirrors…


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The Newsfeed

"I play [games] constantly until 4 in the morning. When I’m not on my game I’m checking my phone. And the whole time I’m doing all of that my desktop is on the internet.”—Male, 22, OH

Twitch is airing every episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, in celebration of the late Fred Rogers’ 90th birthday and the show’s 50th anniversary. The esports streaming service is expanding to nostalgia entertainment (which young viewers can’t get enough of), but they have a unique twist. The show will be available for co-viewing, with popular Twitch streamers chiming in from time to time. (Mashable)

Over one-third of 18-34-year-olds have stopped using a brand after hearing negative news about them, more than any other generation. Among the brands that most consumers said they gave up on were Wells Fargo, Target, Papa John’s, and Uber. However, Critical Mix and kNOW also found that young consumers are more willing to forgive a brand for bad press: While only 30% of consumers overall would use a brand again after a scandal, 41% of 25-34-year-olds would. (MediaPost)

Alamo Drafthouse is bringing back VHS—offering free rentals for Millennials that wax nostalgic for analog products. Their first store, Video Vortex, is opening in North Carolina. Not only are they “fostering a movie-loving community” with the extensive gratis collection of 75,000 titles, but they’re making money off of the added “beer, food, and merchandise.” No VHS player? No problem. They’re renting those as well. (BoingBoingEW)

Researchers were surprised to find Gen Z students were “relieved” to ditch their smartphones for a few weeks. Screen Education’s study of 62 12-16-year-olds found that 92% thought “it was beneficial” to disconnect from their smartphones while they were at camp. And even though 41% admitted they felt frustrated at times, 35% were able to cut down their use after camp and 17% convinced a friend to curb their time spent on smartphones, too. (PR Newswire)

Beauty brands love augmented reality, but an app can’t replace in-store experience. Not only did Ypulse found time and again that young consumers expect Experiencification and flock to marketing activations (like pop-ups), but brick-and-mortar locations build loyalty. People think they’re scamming Sephora when they re-do their makeup gratis, but that time-spent-in-store is really “turning the ‘scammers’ into buyers.” (Quartzy)

"I love my smart phone. It is just like my best friend [and] I just can't do without my smartphone...”—Male, 27, CA

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