Ypulse Essentials: Household Spending On Streaming, Halloween Highlights, National Princess Week

Netflix BufferingDVD sales continue to tank (while household spending on streaming video services, such as Netflix, and DVD rentals from Kiosks, such as Redbox, continues to rise. Much of this trend is driven by Millennials who are less concerned with owning media and care more about having access to media…which is why we disagree that sales of Blu-ray will eventually take off. Speaking of digital movie trends, MTV’s NextMovie is adding MovieTracker which measures buzz about films on social media. The twist is that it not only tracks movies currently at the box office, but also those in development. Right now, “Hunger Games” is topping the list, so we think the measurement must be pretty accurate!) (Yahoo!) (MediaPost)

- Halloween may be over, but it’s still going over on Facebook (as parents post pics of their kids dressed in costume and friends and strangers share them around the Internet. We weren’t surprised — though we were a little disappointed — that nearly half of those who dressed up wore store-bought costumes rather than creatively crafting their own. It’s not just kids that dress up; Halloween is huge on college campuses. So much so that students turn it into a multi-day event) (All Facebook) (Toluna, thanks to David at Scholastic for the link) (Gen Digital)

- We know a lot of tween and teen girls have already bought Justin Bieber’s (“Under the Mistletoe” album which came out today, but they may have also set aside a few dollars for charity. The Biebs announced today that he’s donating a portion of the sales of the album to a selection of charities he selected for their dedication to youth, education, and music, and he’s asking fans to give a little of their own money to the causes to give those less fortunate a happy holiday) (MTV)

- Disney and Target are teaming up to celebrate the…

 
 

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Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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