Ypulse Essentials: Google Music, Digital Distraction, Macy's AR Version Of Virginia

GoogleMusicLast night, Google announced that its Music service (is out of beta and open to the world at large. So far, the Web has been unimpressed by the service, claiming it’s just a copy of iTunes with its exclusive tracks and free songs of the week. But TechCrunch points out that while that may seem to be true, so was Gmail a copy of other email services, but it’s been a huge success because of how the product matured. There are a few aspects of Google Music that we think are particularly relevant to young users… It allows bands — any band — to sell its music on its site, so students can even find that obscure band that they discovered at that tiny show on campus. Music discovery is important to young listeners; it’s a point of pride when they know an artist before their friends do. And don’t discount the significant number of young people who have Android-based smartphones — 26% of students per recent Ypulse research, compared to 25% who have iPhones — who will now have access to the Google Music store in the Android Market. And then there’s the price tag for the service: Free!) (The Verge) (HispanicAd)

- More than three quarters of college students (use digital devices while watching TV. We’re not surprised at all with so many tweeting and posting on Facebook — not to mention checking in to media — while watching TV. And of course that proportion will grow even larger as networks and shows encourage viewers to engage with related content online. Speaking of social viewing, Chill.com, known as the Turntable.com for video, has added integrations with Hulu, Vevo, Livestream, and more, allowing users avatars to have social chats about the content they’re watching. The site still has rooms for VJs to spin videos from YouTube and earn points) (MediaPost) (Mashable)

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without my cousins' annoying kids running in front of the TV.” –Male, 30, MA

Watch your back Instagram. Flipagram’s rise, and its partnership with music labels, could make it the next big sharing platform to watch. The app reached 30 million monthly users after one year, hitting the milestone faster than Facebook and Snapchat before it. Because music can be added to the 30-second photo videos users make, it has set itself apart from competitors Vine and Instagram, and the number of flips made on the platform rose 165% in the last year. (Forbes)

The final film of The Hunger Games franchise is in theatres, ending a wildly successful run at the box office. The movies weren’t considered a sure thing, but became a “runaway smash” because they perfectly matched Millennials’ mindset, becoming “an all-purpose metaphor for life as a young person in the post-recession era.” The theory is that because books debuted just as the recession was beginning, the dark tone and cutthroat storyline aligned with their experiences. (We happen to agree.) (Vox

Millennials continue to think more positively about technology than other generations. According to a 2015 poll, Millennials are more likely than Xers and Boomers to think tech helps them to learn new skills, has a positive impact on their relationships with friends, and allows them to live life the way they want. More than half of Millennials believe that technology positively effects their happiness, compared to 42% of Xers, and 30% of Boomers. (MediaPost)

Millennials might be less traditionally religious than older generations, but they are just as spiritual. While fewer Millennials say religion is very important, attend weekly religious services, or pray every day than Xers, Boomers, and Silents, they are equally likely to think about the meaning and purpose of life, and feel a sense of gratitude or thankfulness each week. (Pew Research)

Advertisements on YouTube Kids are getting the app into some trouble. Ads for junk food regularly appear on the platform “in the form of funny contests and animated stories,” and two complaints have been filed calling for an investigation of food marketers, videos programmers, and Google. The complaints argue that food companies have not lived up to their promises to keep junk food marketing off the app. (NYTimes)

Quote of the Day: "It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without my brother suggesting we don't celebrate and just order pizza.” -Male, 15, GA

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