Ypulse Essentials: Google++++, Digital Abuse Grows, Obama Needs Millennials To Win In 2012

Google+Maybe it should be called Google++++ (considering the fledgling social network managed to post a whopping 1269% increase in traffic over the previous week. What drove the huge leap? The network is now open to everyone and no longer requires invites. With an estimated 43 million users, and 15 million U.S. visitors last week, it rocketed to the 8th most visited social networking website. Does Google+ now have the muscle to beat out Facebook? This group of industry insiders is still undecided, but clearly the argument that “no one’s there” — which matters greatly to Millennials — no longer holds water) (ReadWriteWeb) (PSFK)

- Three quarters of 14-24 year olds say that digital abuse is a serious problem (for people their age, and 56% have experienced such abuse, up from 50% in 2009, according to research from MTV and Associated Press. What’s more, 41% of young people in relationships have experienced digital dating abuse, most commonly with their boyfriend or girlfriend checking up on them multiple times a day online or on their cell phones. Speaking of MTV, on a lighter note, the O Music Awards are back for fall with voting starting today. Celebrating the best in digital music, fans can vote for the Digital Genius Award, Most Addictive Social Music Service, Best Music Forum, and more. Winners will be announced during a live stream on October 31) (AThinLine)

- Young voters may have a significant role (in the 2012 presidential election. A record number of 18-24 year olds turned out for the 2008 elections, and this time around, they’ll be voicing their concerns about youth unemployment, student debt, and more. One way in which Obama has won over Millennials is through his attention to the issue of bullying, which even impressed Lady Gaga. Hollywood connections were influential for Obama…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Google Maps is my GPS and I would be lost without it.” –Female, 22, DE

Young consumers have come of age in the era of social media, are not afraid to say what they think of brands online, and expect a response. Brands should be listening to the feedback, and Topshop proved that they are this week when they announced they would stop displaying mannequins being criticized for looking too skinny. The whole story started with a Facebook post from one shopper, which went viral and pressured the retailer to take action. (Digiday)

Vine has gotten brands’ attention primarily for being a hit with teen users, but in the few years the app has been around, it has evolved from the “Instagram of video“ into a piece of the entertainment industry. The app has made small changes that optimize it for the creators who are broadcasting out to huge audiences, and the users who prefer to watch, not post. (But did the platform make the top ten list of Millennial and teens’ favorite apps?) (Fast Company)

It seems that every week another brand comes out with a campaign to capitalize on the selfie trend, but KFC’s new selfie bucket may be the most entertaining yet. The brand has launched a campaign in Canada featuring the “Memories Bucket,” which takes selfies for diners, then prints them out—and yes, it also holds chicken. Sadly, the bucket was only created for the commercial, but KFC says they are “currently looking to work with some franchise owners to facilitate surprise and delight deliveries of the Memories Buckets to some of our more passionate fans." (Adweek)

Boomer and Xer bosses probably all want to know what motivates Millennial workers—but they might be surprised by some of the answers. A recent study found that working on challenging projects actually ranks higher than top salary for Millennials: 37% said that challenging work is their prime motivation, compared to 18% who said money, and 17% who said “coworkers that I enjoy.” (Forbes)

3-D printing has been called the future of many industries, but could it also be the future of fashion? A 3-D clothing line created by a 27-year-old student is making headlines, and showing that 3D printed style is possible. The collection took over 2,000 hours to print, but the creator, Danit Peleg, believes that the technology could “help democratize fashion and give designers more independence in the creation process.” (Mashable)

Quote of the Day: “I love the Amazon app because I can look up products that I want to buy and store them very easily. I also can scan barcodes while I'm in the store to check for the best price and if I want it, I can click one button to purchase it online instead of paying more for it in a store.” – Female, 29, FL

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