Ypulse Essentials: Corona Light Goes After The Facebook Generation, E! Takes On Eating Disorders, When Grover Goes Viral

Corona Light goes after the Facebook generation (with a new young adult-targeted social media campaign that lets online fans contribute photos to a giant Times Square billboard the company will be running from Nov. 8 to Dec. 6—part of Corona’s push to become the “most liked light beer in America” (Mashable)

- More than 1 in 3 teens would consider skipping or delaying college for cost reasons (36 percent of those responding to a TD Ameritrade Corp. poll said the expenses involved could deter them, up from 31 percent last year. And 79 percent said they viewed a college degree as critical for future success, down from 84 percent a year ago) (Reuters)

- ‘How To Train Your Dragon’ to hit the Cartoon Network (as an animated weekly series in 2012. In the meantime, the network premiers a  ‘How To Train Your Dragon’ short, ‘The Legend of the Boneknapper Dragon,’ featuring voices from the original movie, on Oct. 14 at 8 p.m.—it’ll be in the bonus materials on the DVD that comes out this Friday) (LA Times) (Variety, reg. required)

- E! takes on eating disorders (in a departure from their usual gossip-themed reality programming, with a new six-part documentary series called ‘What’s Eating You,’ following young people struggling with anorexia and bulimia. It premiers tonight at 10 p.m.) (MediaLife)

- Apple patents ‘anti-sexting’ technology (to the chagrin of free speech advocates and delight of parents everywhere. It’s an application that prevents users from sending or receiving “objectionable” text messages, with boundaries that parents can modify) (Gawker)

- ‘16 and Pregnant’ actually makes teens think about avoiding pregnancy (according to a poll conducted by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. Of those who had seen the show, 82 percent said the reality show…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “The issue I most care about during this presidential election is how we are going to resolve this massive student loan problem.”—Male, 23, PA

Hermés is conforming to the new definition of luxury by being more accessible to young, “fashion-obsessed” consumers. The brand has launched a “colorfully-designed” and Instagrammable space stocked with entry-level pieces—including their slimmer Twilly scarf that is priced around $160—at Nordstrom’s Seattle flagship. To allow the consumer the ability “to engage and have fun and try things on without the intimidation,” products are out in the open on “moveable hooks on magnetized walls” instead of behind glass. (Racked)

Millennial entrepreneurs are leading the way for digital advertising. A Magisto survey on Millennial small to medium-sized business owners, revealed that they are spending more than half of their marketing budget on digital media, and are three times more likely than Boomers to spend the majority of their media budget on digital advertising. Social media and video are the main focus for Millennial marketers: 68% say they depend on social media ads to spread brand awareness, 60% leverage social media ads to create revenue, and 88% currently use or want to use video for digital advertising. (Business Wire

A new chatbot wants to monitor kids’ online activity, and educate them as well. Oyoty, targeted for children ages 12 and under, is a friendly bot that links itself to social media accounts and keeps watch of public postings. When Oyoty flags content for a particular issue—for example, a provocative selfie or sharing of personal data—it starts a two-way conversation with the child and explains why they should think twice before posting. To fulfill the aim of educating and empowering children when it comes to online safety, the act of editing or deleting the content is left to the child to execute. (TechCrunch

The digital-native generation is thinking twice before sharing their personal data. A LexisNexis survey on Millennials in the U.S., U.K., Germany, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Mexico, and Brazil, found that young consumers are hesitant to share their personal data, presenting an issue for businesses who “need to gather critical data for better fraud prevention.” In the U.S. about two-thirds of Millennials are worried about identity theft and data breaches—which was “surprisingly lower than most of their global counterparts, of whom more than 75 percent are concerned.” (FinextraPYMNTS

Finance publication Barron’s has launched a Millennial-focused site to hook in the next generation of investors. With a focus on quick daily stock analysis, video, and personal finance stories, Barron’s Next aims to give young consumers “an easy way to understand the economy and begin to take their first steps as investors.” Like S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, Barron’s Next also offers Next 50—a snapshot of stocks from brands that “young consumers love,” like Urban Outfitters and Tesla. (Digiday)  

Quote of the Day: “For Halloween I’m dressing up as Erlich Bachman from the HBO show Silicon Valley.”—Male, 24, IN

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