Ypulse Essentials: Blockbuster's Movie Pass, More Nickelodeon Nostalgia, Books On-Demand

Blockbuster is back and ready to battle Netflix and Qwikster (with Blockbuster Movie Pass, a service that lets users stream content and rent movies and games-by-mail. Unlike Netflix which has split into two companies, the Blockbuster Movie Pass will allow viewers to watch content on both mediums through one subscription and for the same price as Netflix. Sounds appealing, especially to Millennials who are likely to want both options without paying two fees. However, we sense a fight as big as Facebook vs Google+ brewing) (TechCrunch)

- In another attempt to cater to nostalgic Millennials (Nickelodeon and retailer Johnny Cupcakes are selling an exclusive line of t-shirts featuring some of Gen Y’s favorite cartoon characters including SpongeBob Squarepants, CatDog, Rugrats, and Ren & Stimpy. We’re not sure if the clothing will be as popular as Nick’s retro programming since wearing animated characters on shirts seems a little childish, but then again, that’s the point of nostalgia, and it’s been working for the network) (Cynopsis)

- It’s a tough time for the book business (but there may be a solution to help bookstores and publishers alike: printing on-demand. Espresso Book Machines enable a book to be printed in a matter of minutes, which means shelves don’t have to be stocked for paperbacks to sell. HarperCollins is making 5,000 titles available in this format and we’re curious to see how consumers respond) (WSJ)

- We bet teen girls will be flocking to theaters this weekend to see ‘Twilight’ star Taylor Lautner in the film ‘Abduction’ (about a teenage boy who finds out his parents aren’t really his. You won’t find werewolves and vampires in this flick, but we think it will be popular nonetheless. Speaking of movies, the Children’s Advertising Review Unit is angered

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: "I follow the news so I can make fun of the GOP presidential candidates..." -Male, 30, KN 

Selfies might be the next innovation in online security. MasterCard is experimenting with facial recognition scans that would ask users to simply look into their phones and blink to approve a purchase. Biometric security like face scans and fingerprints are easier than remembering a password, and the brand believes that “the new generation, which is into selfies…they'll find it cool. They'll embrace it." (CNN Money)

Millennials’ history of disrupting industries has many long-standing brands making big changes to appeal to young consumers—who are aging into their years of spending power dominance. Time’s list of “old person” brands getting a Millennial makeover include Maxwell House, Residence Inn, NASCAR, Good Humor, and KFC—all launching rebrands and “tweaking old products…with varying degrees of success—and awkwardness.” NASCAR’s efforts include a racing festival that includes DJs and foam parties. (Time)

We included golf on our list of things Millennials are being accused of killing, and now golf clubs breaking some sport taboos to try to attract young players. Footgolf, a hybrid soccer/golf game attracting twenty-somethings, is being offered by some. Speedier games, speakers on carts, prizes for Instagram golf pics, and beer tastings are other tactics being employed—and upsetting traditional golfers. (Chicago Business)

Put on your top hat and bow tie, the “Monopoly movie has passed go.” Lionsgate and Hasbro have greenlit a film based on everyone’s favorite property trading game, and starter of family fights. The 80-year-old board game is the latest classic toy box item to be given time on the big screen, and the film will reportedly be an action/adventure following a boy from Baltic Avenue building his fortune, and of course avoiding bankruptcy and jail. (Kidscreen)

Unplugging is not just a trend with young consumers here in the U.S. A survey of 16-24-year-olds in the U.K. found that only half watch live TV, preferring online streaming for the rest of their media consumption. Online viewing has “disproportionately affected” news shows, and TV news viewing among the age group has dropped 29% between 2008 and 2014. In our most recent media viewing tracker, we found that 29% of 13-32-year-olds watch live cable five or more days per week, while 35% watch Netflix and 10% watch Hulu Plus five or more days per week. (The Guardian)

The glittery dust has settled. There is no longer any question that digital celebrities’ popularity rivals Hollywood stars’—for teens, they’re even more popular. So what does celebrity look like now? Fame has been redefined by the next generation of viewers, and we’re officially in a new era of celebrity influencers. We cover this trend in-depth our Q2 2015 Ypulse Quarterly report, available to Gold subscribers. (One-off pricing for the report is $1250.) (Ypulse)

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