Ypulse Essentials: Alloy's First Digital Slate, American Eagle Opens Kids Chain, 'Britain's Next Top Model'

hollywoodhighschoolAlloy’s first official digital slate (Newly formed digital division Banks & Reed announce three original teen web series coming this summer and fall. This includes an adaptation of YA book Hollywood is like High School with Money [pictured here] Also ‘The Guild’ returns for a fourth season) (Tubefilter) (via Pop Candy)

-YMCA rebrands as ‘The Y’ (to coincide with “efforts to emphasize the impact its programs have on youth, healthy living and communities.” And Jezebel talks to Girl Scouts Senior Brand Manager Sharon Lee after their lukewarm review of the new logo) (New York Times, reg. required)

- American Eagle opens kids stores (expanding on its 77kids line. And in her first post-Hills career move, Audrina Patridge is the new face of surf brand Bongo) (WSJ, reg. required)

- Mashable spotlights Headliner (a cool recommendation exchange to help artists and bands promote each other on MySpace, Twitter and Facebook. Also GodBlock a web filter targeted towards parents and schools who want to prevent “kids from being indoctrinated into any religion before they are of the age to make such decisions”... might be an elaborate hoax) (MSNBC)

- Comic-Con schedule announced (Also Mark Ruffalo to step in for Edward Norton as “The Hulk” in “The Avengers.” And new featurette fuels the hype machine for “Scott Pilgrim Vs The World” (via Pop Candy) (Den of Geek)

- Disney’s ‘Socerer’s Apprentice’ opens midweek (And an untitled Gargoyles movie in the works at Disney is described as Socerer’s ‘spiritual sequel’) (Variety, reg. required) (Cinemablend)

- ‘Britain’s Next Top Model’ slammed (by The Guardian’s arts editor for a lad mag photo shoot—thanks Derek! Meanwhile the Beauty Mirror iPhone app looks to help parents send positive messages to their tween girls )

- What would-be teen moms can learn from…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Google Maps is my GPS and I would be lost without it.” –Female, 22, DE

Young consumers have come of age in the era of social media, are not afraid to say what they think of brands online, and expect a response. Brands should be listening to the feedback, and Topshop proved that they are this week when they announced they would stop displaying mannequins being criticized for looking too skinny. The whole story started with a Facebook post from one shopper, which went viral and pressured the retailer to take action. (Digiday)

Vine has gotten brands’ attention primarily for being a hit with teen users, but in the few years the app has been around, it has evolved from the “Instagram of video“ into a piece of the entertainment industry. The app has made small changes that optimize it for the creators who are broadcasting out to huge audiences, and the users who prefer to watch, not post. (But did the platform make the top ten list of Millennial and teens’ favorite apps?) (Fast Company)

It seems that every week another brand comes out with a campaign to capitalize on the selfie trend, but KFC’s new selfie bucket may be the most entertaining yet. The brand has launched a campaign in Canada featuring the “Memories Bucket,” which takes selfies for diners, then prints them out—and yes, it also holds chicken. Sadly, the bucket was only created for the commercial, but KFC says they are “currently looking to work with some franchise owners to facilitate surprise and delight deliveries of the Memories Buckets to some of our more passionate fans." (Adweek)

Boomer and Xer bosses probably all want to know what motivates Millennial workers—but they might be surprised by some of the answers. A recent study found that working on challenging projects actually ranks higher than top salary for Millennials: 37% said that challenging work is their prime motivation, compared to 18% who said money, and 17% who said “coworkers that I enjoy.” (Forbes)

3-D printing has been called the future of many industries, but could it also be the future of fashion? A 3-D clothing line created by a 27-year-old student is making headlines, and showing that 3D printed style is possible. The collection took over 2,000 hours to print, but the creator, Danit Peleg, believes that the technology could “help democratize fashion and give designers more independence in the creation process.” (Mashable)

Quote of the Day: “I love the Amazon app because I can look up products that I want to buy and store them very easily. I also can scan barcodes while I'm in the store to check for the best price and if I want it, I can click one button to purchase it online instead of paying more for it in a store.” – Female, 29, FL

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