Youth Media And Marketing Movers & Shakers

Today we bring you another installment of Youth Media Movers and Shakers. We’ve culled through industry publications looking for the recent executive placements we think you should know about. If you have executive news that you want us to highlight in our next “Movers and Shakers,” email us.

Sharon Lieblein is named VP Casting and Talent Development for Cartoon Network. She was previously VP of Talent and Casting for Nickelodeon. (Via Kidscreen)

Cecile Goyette has been named Executive Editor at Blue Apple Books. She had been executive editor at Alfred A. Knopf Children’s Books. (Via Mediabistro, reg required)

David Weinstock has been named Executive Creative Director at Mr. Youth. He had been Creative Director at Euro RSCG. (Via Agency Spy)

Laurel Ritchie is named President of the WNBA. She was formerly Chief Marketing Officer for Girl Scouts. (Via Ad Age, reg required)

Jackie French is promoted to SVP Series Development for MTV. French, a driving force behind such MTV hits as Jersey Shore and The Real World, will continue to oversee creative development and production on a number of MTV series, including Jersey Shore, on which she serves as an executive producer, and The Real World, now in its 25th season. French was previously VP, MTV Series Production. (Via Deadline Hollywood)

Chris Rantamaki is named VP Original Series for Spike TV. He will oversee the development of non-scripted series. Rantamaki was previously with Discovery Channel, where he was VP of production and oversaw such series as Auction Kings, The Colony, Howe & Howe Tech, and Gang Wars. (Via Deadline Hollywood)

Caroline McCarthy joins the Trends & Insights Team at Google, tasked with “humanizing” the search giant’s massive amounts of user data. She had been a blogger with CNET for the past five…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite brand on social media is Complex, because it's more of an online network that reports on urban culture.”

—Male, 23, MI

Luxury watch brands are innovating to cater to what could be their biggest opportunity: Generation Z. A September 2016 survey from Mintel found one in five 16-24-year-olds reported they were thinking of buying a watch “in the coming months,” and that “the young are the biggest buyers of all age groups.” As a result, watch brands are taking marketing online. Omega says that social media is not part of their marketing strategy but “the way [they] communicate.” (Financial Times)  

A group of moms is making hijabs for Barbie to battle Islamophobia. Created through a partnership with the non-profit For Good, Hello Hijab sells $6 handmade headscarves for dolls, available April 1st, along with a card explaining what the accessory is. As one founder explains, the aim is for a more inclusive generation: “They will see it as a kind memory from their playtime, and then they will grow into a kinder generation…used to playing with dolls that look different to them.” Profits from the new doll accessory will go to support multicultural communities. (RT)

Netflix is winning the “steaming wars”—at least on home TV sets. comScore’s analysis into video streamed over Wi-Fi to televisions in U.S. homes found Netflix’s penetration is around 40%, while YouTube, the next most-used service, was less than 30%. Both Amazon and Hulu are far behind at below 20%, but the latter was found to have engagement rates on par with Netflix: “People who do use [them] use [them] a lot…Both services engage their users for more than 25 hours a month.” (Recode)

Chipotle wants to "slyly” promote kids’ healthy food habits with an unbranded video series. RAD Lands, available for purchase on iTunes, follows “the Cultivators” as they try to save the galaxy’s animals and plants, and features cooking segments with celebrity chefs and musical appearances by the likes of Biz Markie and Wayne Coyne of the Flaming Lips. Described as an “entertainment Trojan horse,” the series is all about educating the next generation while also making a play to win back consumers after the brand’s food-related illness issue. (Ad Age

Airbnb is launching Aibiying, a new brand to target Chinese Millennials. The company’s research has shown an increase of 142% of travel out of China in 2016, and 80% of their users in the country are under 35. The young travelers are also a “lucrative market” according to one expert: "Chinese Millennials are likely to travel farther afield -- and to spend more while traveling—as their disposable incomes and appetite for adventure grow." Aibiying, which translates to "Welcome each other with love,” will include the brand’s latest “Trips” and “Experiences” features. (Inc.

Quote of the Day: “Budweiser ads are memorable because they pull at the heart strings with the horses and dogs.”—Female, 22, CA

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