Youth Media And Marketing Movers & Shakers

Today we bring you another installment of Youth Media Movers and Shakers. We’ve culled through industry publications looking for the recent executive placements we think you should know about. If you have executive news that you want us to highlight in our next “Movers and Shakers,” email us.

Sharon Lieblein is named VP Casting and Talent Development for Cartoon Network. She was previously VP of Talent and Casting for Nickelodeon. (Via Kidscreen)

Cecile Goyette has been named Executive Editor at Blue Apple Books. She had been executive editor at Alfred A. Knopf Children’s Books. (Via Mediabistro, reg required)

David Weinstock has been named Executive Creative Director at Mr. Youth. He had been Creative Director at Euro RSCG. (Via Agency Spy)

Laurel Ritchie is named President of the WNBA. She was formerly Chief Marketing Officer for Girl Scouts. (Via Ad Age, reg required)

Jackie French is promoted to SVP Series Development for MTV. French, a driving force behind such MTV hits as Jersey Shore and The Real World, will continue to oversee creative development and production on a number of MTV series, including Jersey Shore, on which she serves as an executive producer, and The Real World, now in its 25th season. French was previously VP, MTV Series Production. (Via Deadline Hollywood)

Chris Rantamaki is named VP Original Series for Spike TV. He will oversee the development of non-scripted series. Rantamaki was previously with Discovery Channel, where he was VP of production and oversaw such series as Auction Kings, The Colony, Howe & Howe Tech, and Gang Wars. (Via Deadline Hollywood)

Caroline McCarthy joins the Trends & Insights Team at Google, tasked with “humanizing” the search giant’s massive amounts of user data. She had been a blogger with CNET for the past five…


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“I’ve been using Apple products for years. Although Samsung technology is probably better, I am so used to Apple that I would probably not switch.”—Female, 18, PA

Major financial institutions are still trying to figure Millennials out, so Prudential conducted a survey to gather some much-needed intel. The Great Recession-era adults are pessimistic about their financial futures: 79% don’t believe that “comfortable retirement” will be a possibility when they’re in their 80s and 70% think “it’s impossible” to save the recommended annual amount to make it possible. Ypulse found that saving for retirement falls behind other, more imminent financial priorities. (MediaPost)

Teens are rallying around the issue of gun control in increasing numbers. A recent survey from Everytown for Gun Safety and Giffords (conducted by Ypulse) found that gun violence prevention is the top issue young people expect the candidate they vote for in 2018 to take a stance on. Six in ten 15-18-year-olds said they’re “’passionate’ about reducing gun violence” and 72% of 15-30-year-olds agreed that politicians who don’t do more to combat gun violence shouldn’t be re-elected. (Mic)

Need proof that the future of STEM is female? Just take a look at children’s drawings. From 1966-1977, researchers asked 5,000 students to draw a scientist, and about 99% of them drew men. Fast forward the same study to 1985-2016, and one-third of children drew a female scientist. But we still have a long way to go to break gender stereotypes: 14-15-year-olds “drew more male than female scientists by an average ratio of 4-to1." (CNN)

Digital consignment store ThredUp wants to open 100 IRL stores. They’re expanding their physical footprint from two to ten stores this year, with more planned for the future. Why are online-only brands increasingly building bricks-and-mortar? (Think: Glossier, Everlane, even ThredUp competitors like The RealReal). Creating experiences with guests from a common check-out up to an in-store event builds “trust” and “awareness.” (Glossy)

Are Instagram and dating apps “crippling” relationships? Psychotherapist Esther Perel thinks so. Ypulse data shows 27% of 18-35-year-olds have used a dating app, 12% use them weekly, and nearly eight in ten use other social media apps weekly or more often. All that time scrolling past potential partners creates a new kind of loneliness: Instead of feeling “socially isolated,” they’re “experiencing a loss of trust and a loss of capital while you are next to the person with whom you’re not supposed to be lonely.” (Recode)

“We should be nice and good to others because we would want the same in return, being rude to someone doesn't make the situation any better.”—Female, 21, MI

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