Youth Media And Marketing Movers & Shakers

Today we bring you another installment of Youth Media Movers and Shakers. We’ve culled through industry publications looking for the recent executive placements we think you should know about. If you have executive news that you want us to highlight in our next “Movers and Shakers,” email us.

Rich Ross resigns as Chairman of Walt Disney Studios, leaving behind a legacy of “film flops” and questions about the studio’s future. (Via LA Times)

Cecile Frot-Coutaz is named CEO for FremantleMedia; she is currently CEO, FremantleMedia North America. Her appointment was announced simultaneously with the news that current CEO, Tony Cohen, is stepping down from that position to focus on his non-executive work. (Via Hollywood Reporter)

Disney Publishing Worldwide makes two appointments: Darrell DeMakes is named Senior Producer, Digital; he had been Senior Manager at Nokia. Michele Wells has been named Senior Editor, Digital; she had been senior editor at DK Publishing. (Via Mediabistro, reg required)

Tom Ascheim is named to the newly created position of Chief Strategy Officer and EVP/Sesame Learning at Sesame Workshop. Most recently, Ascheim was the CEO of Newsweek, and he previously ran Nickelodeon’s TV group, overseeing Nickelodeon, Nick at Nite, Nick Jr., Noggin (now Nick Jr. channel), Nicktoons and The N (TeenNick). (Via Cynopsis)

Jennifer LaBracio has joined Little, Brown Books for Young Readers as Associate Director of Marketing. She was most recently Senior Marketing Manager at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children’s. (Via Publishers Marketplace)

Condé Nast Entertainment announces two hires: Jeremy Steckler becomes EVP of Motion Pictures and Michael Klein becomes EVP of alternative programming. (Via MediaPost)

Jamie Engel has been named VP and Publisher at Scholastic Parent &…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“Most of the role models and leaders in my life have been Gen Xers so far."

–Male, 16, WI

Instagram has reached 700 million active users, and its growth has been speeding up. The app hit the new user mark just four months after reaching 600 million, and the introduction of Instagram stories in August may be a major contributor to its accelerated growth. The feature has a reported 200 million daily active users compared to Snapchat’s 161 million. Overall, Instagram now has twice the user base of Twitter and is quickly approaching the coveted 1 billion user mark that Facebook, WhatsApp, and Messenger have reached. (TechCrunch)

Millennials are using social media and YouTube to decide what to buy. A U.K. study found 32% of 18-24-year-olds are using social media to research their purchase decisions before checking out, and 25% are using video platforms like YouTube. There are also signs they’d like to search for products on social media: 25% of U.K. 18-24-year-olds reported the desire to search media based on their lifestyle and 23% would like search to understand their current mood. These findings, paired with the detailed targeting available to advertisers, are changing the consumer journey from search query to cart. (AdvertisingWeek)

Millennials are keeping 70% of their money in cash, reluctant to invest in anything, from stocks to their own retirement plans—according to new BlackRock research. Clearly impacted by the Great Recession, Millennials are most likely to agree, "What you might earn investing isn't worth the risk of losing your money," and a third say “they learned what not to do with their money” from watching their parents. They also tend to undervalue the potential returns of investments by millions of dollars, which is not good news for their futures—at their current rate, most Millennials will have less than $1 million saved for retirement. (TheStreet)

Influencer marketing is proving its worth. Though marketers have worried about determining ROI with the approach, one report is claiming it’s more effective than advertising alone, showing a direct lift in results rates of up to 30%. Across 450 influencers and 11 campaigns, the expansive research compared results from consumers exposed to ads featuring influencers versus control groups, overwhelmingly showing increased action when an influencer was involved. Good news for marketers, who spent $570 million on influencer marketing on Instagram alone last year. (Adweek)

The Amazon Echo can now help pick your outfit—and tell you when you don’t look good. LED lights and a depth-sensing camera will let the new Echo Look take pictures of any look, and “Style Check” software “combines machine learning algorithms with advice from fashion specialists” to evaluate which outfit is best, and lets you compare pictures of multiple outfits, from multiple angles. Amazon’s already extensive product recommendations could feasibly be a part of this product’s future—and, if all goes well, a drone will ship the recommended new clothes to your door. (Quartz)

“I want to work for myself so that I can have more flexibility and be my own boss. I have an online business.”
—Female, 16, FL

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