Youth Media And Marketing Movers & Shakers

Today we bring you another installment of Youth Media Movers and Shakers. We’ve culled through industry publications looking for the recent executive placements we think you should know about. If you have executive news that you want us to highlight in our next “Movers and Shakers,” email us.

Rich Ross resigns as Chairman of Walt Disney Studios, leaving behind a legacy of “film flops” and questions about the studio’s future. (Via LA Times)

Cecile Frot-Coutaz is named CEO for FremantleMedia; she is currently CEO, FremantleMedia North America. Her appointment was announced simultaneously with the news that current CEO, Tony Cohen, is stepping down from that position to focus on his non-executive work. (Via Hollywood Reporter)

Disney Publishing Worldwide makes two appointments: Darrell DeMakes is named Senior Producer, Digital; he had been Senior Manager at Nokia. Michele Wells has been named Senior Editor, Digital; she had been senior editor at DK Publishing. (Via Mediabistro, reg required)

Tom Ascheim is named to the newly created position of Chief Strategy Officer and EVP/Sesame Learning at Sesame Workshop. Most recently, Ascheim was the CEO of Newsweek, and he previously ran Nickelodeon’s TV group, overseeing Nickelodeon, Nick at Nite, Nick Jr., Noggin (now Nick Jr. channel), Nicktoons and The N (TeenNick). (Via Cynopsis)

Jennifer LaBracio has joined Little, Brown Books for Young Readers as Associate Director of Marketing. She was most recently Senior Marketing Manager at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children’s. (Via Publishers Marketplace)

Condé Nast Entertainment announces two hires: Jeremy Steckler becomes EVP of Motion Pictures and Michael Klein becomes EVP of alternative programming. (Via MediaPost)

Jamie Engel has been named VP and Publisher at Scholastic Parent &…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I was completely invested in Breaking Bad, it took a simple everyday man and slowly dehumanized him through choices that an individual in real life could have possibly made or gone through.”—Male, 22, NJ

The creators of livestreaming pioneer Meerkat made a new app in secret—and it’s doing great. Houseparty is a group video chat platform designed to “capture some of the spirit of Meerkat but in a more personal way that encourages users to participate.” Users can create or join “rooms” to video chat with friends, and are warned if an unknown mutual friend joins the group. The app opens to a camera like Snapchat, is “sprinkled liberally” with emojis, and has already generated almost 1 million mostly teenage users during its testing phase. (Mashable)

Neiman Marcus is in full support of the "see now, buy now" retail strategy some brands have been adopting to keep up with impatient young consumers. The retailer has seen sales decline for fourth straight quarters, and is citing an “out-of-sync fashion cycle” as a crucial part of their troubles. Now that just launched collections are "blogged and broadcasted all over the world via social media," and fast fashion retailers are “delivering trends before ‘authentic runway looks are delivered to stores,’” the retailer is encouraging their vendors to deliver products quickly after release to keep up. (Fashionista

Club Med knows not all Millennials are “frugal single travelers.” The travel brand, “where all the cool kids went in the 70s and 80s,” is now setting their sights on affluent Millennial parents who travel. Spending $1.5 billion in facilities upgrades, Club Med now offers “zen oases,” where “parents to briefly recuperate away from their kids” and escape the pressures of work and home. They also are focusing on the experiential aspect of their brand, adjusting their website to allow visitors to experience their trips digitally before their buy. (Skift)

Kano, one of the first and most unique toys to teach kids coding, is heading back to the Kickstarter to promote three new programmable do-it-yourself kits. Their new products focus on a toy coming “to life when it responds to its environment," and includes a Pixel display that can be taught to display different colors and shapes in response to sounds. The brand’s target market is 8-14-year-olds, but they aim to make it “simple for anyone in the world to make, hack, create, manipulate, and warp technology as it is to use it today." (Fast Company)

Marketing to the post-Millennial generation is all about getting creative, and serving ads through sponsored content is resonating strongly with teens who fully understand it’s a marketing strategy. When AwesomenessTV looked into their popular series Royal Crush—which takes place on a cruise ship and is sponsored by Royal Caribbean—they found that is was 30% more efficient than TV. But one form of traditional advertising is still effective: sampling. To promote their moon sneakers and hot sauce, GE toured colleges to target engineering students. (Adweek

Quote of the Day:  “Young and Hungry are short 30 minute shows, so I can watch it on my lunch breaks at work. I like the humor and the characters. The story line is easy to follow. It's an easy show to binge watch.”—Female, 20, WS

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies