Youth Media And Marketing Movers & Shakers

Today we bring you another installment of Youth Media Movers and Shakers. We’ve culled through industry publications looking for the recent executive placements we think you should know about. If you have executive news that you want us to highlight in our next “Movers and Shakers,” email us.

Rich Ross resigns as Chairman of Walt Disney Studios, leaving behind a legacy of “film flops” and questions about the studio’s future. (Via LA Times)

Cecile Frot-Coutaz is named CEO for FremantleMedia; she is currently CEO, FremantleMedia North America. Her appointment was announced simultaneously with the news that current CEO, Tony Cohen, is stepping down from that position to focus on his non-executive work. (Via Hollywood Reporter)

Disney Publishing Worldwide makes two appointments: Darrell DeMakes is named Senior Producer, Digital; he had been Senior Manager at Nokia. Michele Wells has been named Senior Editor, Digital; she had been senior editor at DK Publishing. (Via Mediabistro, reg required)

Tom Ascheim is named to the newly created position of Chief Strategy Officer and EVP/Sesame Learning at Sesame Workshop. Most recently, Ascheim was the CEO of Newsweek, and he previously ran Nickelodeon’s TV group, overseeing Nickelodeon, Nick at Nite, Nick Jr., Noggin (now Nick Jr. channel), Nicktoons and The N (TeenNick). (Via Cynopsis)

Jennifer LaBracio has joined Little, Brown Books for Young Readers as Associate Director of Marketing. She was most recently Senior Marketing Manager at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children’s. (Via Publishers Marketplace)

Condé Nast Entertainment announces two hires: Jeremy Steckler becomes EVP of Motion Pictures and Michael Klein becomes EVP of alternative programming. (Via MediaPost)

Jamie Engel has been named VP and Publisher at Scholastic Parent &…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“I love reality TV shows. It's always fun to watch average people make themselves look foolish just for a shot at fame.”

—Female, 17, CA

“Bored kids” and “desperate parents” are the most likely to love their smart speakers. Nine out of ten children who own one say they enjoy their device, and 57% of all smart speaker owners with children admit entertaining their children was one of the reasons they opted for the purchase. Ypulse found 13-34-year-olds consider Amazon Alexa one of the “coolest tech products” so it’s no surprise smart speaker owners love their devices: 65% “would not want to go back to their lives before getting one,” 42% consider it an everyday “essential,” and over half of parents plan to purchase another. (Fast Company)

Plastic surgery is reportedly having a moment with Millennial men. According to the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, of the over one-third of men who are “extremely likely” to consider cosmetic procedures, 58% are 25-34-years-old and 34% are 18-24-years-old. Some reasons they’re willing to go under the knife (or needle)? To boost their self-confidence, to appear less tired or stressed, and to stay competitive in their careers. Experts say social media and the self-care trend is making men more appearance-conscious. (Bloomberg)

Reading Rainbow is back and it’s all grown-up, just like its fans. The well-loved show's host, LeVar Burton, is picking up a book and laying down a podcast for his Millennial fans. He’ll be reading selected works of fiction and breaking down the themes just like in the old days, but he’s also adding a little something extra: his personal take on the tale. The only thing missing from the original PBS Kid’s show? The coveted chance to get on screen and read a review from your favorite story.

(Huffington Post)

Gen Z is thinking finances-first when making college decisions. Almost 80% consider the cost of an institution in their decision of where to attend, which makes sense considering over one in three are planning to pay for part or all their expenses. Avoiding the student loan debt that most Millennials know all too well is a key component of their finance-savvy thinking: 69% of teens are concerned about taking on loans, and the number of teens who plan to borrow has dropped 10% since 2016. (CSF)

Leisure and hospitality are the “hottest” jobs for teens this summer. A full 41% of teens went into leisure and hospitality last year, nearly double those that landed a wholesale and retail gig. Education and health services rounded out the top three, with all other industries claiming 5% or less of the summer teen workforce. When Ypulse asked teens where they’re planning to work this summer, restaurants and fast food jobs combined would land the top spot on the list. (Markets Insider)

“Everybody loves Drake. People that claim to not like Drake don't know themselves well enough.”

—Female, 21, CA

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