YAB Review: “Flutter” By Gina Linko

Today's post comes from Youth Advisory Board member Molly who recently read "Flutter" by Gina Linko. The YA novel is about Emery, a teenage girl whose mind travels through time while her body suffers from seizures. In her time loops, Emery sees people she knows, and others who she doesn't, including Asher, a boy who she's somehow linked to. Instead of being "studied" instenly in the hospital until she dies, Emery decides to escape and meet Ash in real life. The novel follows Emery throughout her journey to figure out their connection. It's a unique and gripping story as Molly explains that's as much a coming of age novel as it is a mystery.

YAB Review: “Flutter” By Gina Linko

flutterFirst impressions

Flutter is about a seventeen-year-old girl named Emery who suffers from what appears to be seizures. She's able to hide them from most people throughout her adolescence, attending a school for the arts and living a normal life, but her senior year, the seizures become so frequent and violent that she has to be hospitalized.

What Emery knows and tries to explain to everyone from her father to her doctors is that her seizures are not caused by epilepsy or any other disease; they're a result of her time traveling. She has jumped forward in time to speak to her future dad, back in time to see her mom as a child, and most often, to a time and place she's not familiar with, where she meets a young boy she somehow knows needs her help.

Sum it up

"Flutter" is, at it's core, a mystery and an intense coming of age story. No one in the hospital believes that Emery is time traveling, but as more doctors study her, she realizes they do recognize that the intensity of the seizures are quickly killing her. Her dad, a scientist, seems to be concerned for her well-being only as a subject, not as a…

 
 

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