YAB Members Report: Is College Still Worth It?

As debt runs deep in students’ pockets, the decision to continue education past high school is no longer a given. In 2012, undergraduate and graduate enrollment decreased for the first time in six years, dropping by half a million. The value that Millennials gain from a college degree is being questioned, and when weighed against impending student loans and a shaky job market, the odds don’t seem to be in their favor. How prepared do Millennials feel to tackle life out of high school and college? What is it like to be in college knowing that the degree you are earning might not be worth what you need it to be when you graduate? We spoke to Millennials from our Youth Advisory Board to hear what they had to say about their high school and college careers, and what the landscape of education looks like for them.
 
The Recession Put Education Into Perspective.
Millennials were no doubt hit hard by the recession, and for many students, it dictated their path going forward. YAB member Maddie, 19, has always kept college in her trajectory, but feels that it became even more important during this time, causing her to “begin to consider graduate school so I can be even more specialized and unique to future employers.” Camilla, 23, took that path as well, “taking the time for grad school, and making sure I had full funding (i.e. a salary and research funds) for my PhD.” Both rely on external funding through scholarships and grants, and help from parents in order to get by. But for some, parental support is not an option. For YAB member Skyanne, 18, “the recession made it clear that regardless of what society says, sometimes college just isn’t an option.” Boxed out of financial aid and without a co-signer for loans, paying out of pocket is the final option and is near impossible for a high…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Next winter I will be going on a solo backpacking trip through Southeast Asia and India. I plan to visit ashrams in India, go hiking and kayaking through SE Asia, try new cuisines, meet locals, and get off the beaten path.” – Female, 26, CO

Last month, we told you we could be seeing the end of the long-standing “sex sells” standby thanks to the “seen it all” generation. Now more research is backing up the idea that sex doesn’t actually sell. Ad testing firm Ameritest asked consumers about Carl’s Jr.’s latest spot featuring a nearly-naked model and found 32% felt worse about the brand after seeing the ad, compared to 8% who feel the same after watching an average fast food commercial. (DigidayAdAge)

A new wave of live streaming apps have been gaining young consumers’ attention—but how are they stacking up against more established social media platforms? Horizon Media’s infographic looks at the state of apps like Meerkat and Periscope, and finds 18-34-year-olds are more likely than older consumers to use them. But while Millennials are also more likely to have heard of these live streaming apps, awareness is still quite low compared to Snapchat, Instagram, and Vine. (Adweek)

The Good Humor man is getting a makeover to appeal to the next generation of ice cream consumers. The brand says they’re changing their trucks to capture the attention of today’s kids, who may be too distracted by devices to hear them coming down the street. In some areas, drivers are being given a more modern dress code, and the now brightly painted trucks’ jingles are being changed to pop hits from artists like Beyoncé and Taylor Swift. (NYPost)

Millennials want to work in tech—specifically for Google. A new report found that tech brands take up the top three spots in the list of places 18-34-year-olds would want to work, with nearly 20% naming Google as their ideal employer, 13% naming Apple, and 9% naming Facebook. Google’s top ranking is fairly unsurprising considering their consistently high marks in employee perks and benefits. (Business Insider)

Emoji are replacing internet slang, infiltrating fashion, and more brands have been creating emoji-centric marketing campaigns in order to appeal to Millennials and teens. Now nonprofit hotline BRIS has launched Abused Emojis, a new emoji alphabet that includes icons for parent drinking, a child being hurt, thinking about death, and other difficult issues. The intention is for kids to use these symbols “to talk about situations where they felt bad or wrongly treated” without having to verbalize their complex problems. (Fast Company)

We give you a dose of insights on young consumers each day, but every quarter, we zoom our lens out to look at some of the larger trends happening with Millennials and teens—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, which synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" of big shifts and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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