YAB Member Reports: Engaging with the Second Screen

Multi-tasking has taken over entertainment, and there is no turning back. We know that young viewers are more likely than not engaging with multiple screens simultaneously when relaxing– even while watching their favorite shows. This new form of engagement has turned Millennials into active participants when it comes to media engagement, instead of passive ones. Because of this, the second screen (or third, or fourth) can prove to be an opportunity for brands that take advantage of the multi-tasking viewer mindset by making multi-platform entertainment even more engaging than a single screen experience. Still, many questions remain– will young viewers willingly participate in the viewing apps, fan chats and enhanced content being made available to them? Also, how are young consumers actually engaging with the second screen entertainment flooding the market? Our 24-year-old YAB member Danielle gives us a glimpse at how second screen engagement is changing the way she watches and talks about TV. 

 

No remote? No problem.

With the help of our smartphones, laptops, and tablets, TV viewership has completely transformed. Now, we not only stream our favorite shows on-the-go from these devices, but we can also obtain instant feedback from people anywhere in the world who share similar taste in television. This second (or third, or fourth) screen has allowed us to engage instantaneously with friends, television networks, and social communities who share our television program preferences. 

Whether it’s a reality show, the Oscars, the Super Bowl, a POTUS press conference, or the season finale of Pretty Little Liars (which recently just became the first series in TV history to accumulate over 1 million total airtime tweets, according to the New York Post), the addition of multiple screens…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I am the one who buys random beauty products to recommend to friends if they are good.” –Male, 14, KN

Millennial travelers want the opposite of what their parents looked for in a hotel. Marriott International says that while Boomers “wanted familiarity, safety, and comfort," the next generation of travelers “want local and unique.” Global experiments in changing hotels to match their preferences have resulted in pop-up roof bars and locally sourced cheese-and-charcuterie restaurants. The brand predicts that Millennials could make up half of their guests by 2020—if they are able to appeal to them. (Fast Company)

Put your cookbooks away, younger consumers are bringing their devices into the kitchen. Think With Google and Kraft Foods' research revealed that 59% of 25-34-year-olds cook with their smartphones or tablets handy, while consumers over 35-years-old are more likely to print out a recipe. Search interest for “best recipes” on YouTube is reportedly up 48%, and “how to cook that” has become one of the top 10 most popular how-to searches on the site. (MediaPostDirect Marketing News)

The Apple Watch may not be Millennials’ cup of tech tea. A new study finds that “Millennials are dissatisfied with the Watch,” because the thrill of using it wears off after 30 days, and it feels like a “weak extension of their iPhone.” Others felt guilt over wearing the Watch because it seems ostentatious or frivolous. Not having a “killer app” could be another problem, though the initial reactions to the device aren’t necessarily an indication the Watch is doomed. (MSNCNBC)

Taco Bell says that understanding Millennials’ diversity and experience-driven mindset are the keys to being successful with the generation. Transitioning the brand from “Think Outside the Bun” to “Live Mas” is a part of their continued efforts to target younger consumers, who CEO Brian Niccol says see food as experience, not fuel. The chain strives to be “culturally relevant to the 25-year-old” because, “if you’re 40 you want to be 25, and if you’re 15 you want to be 25.” (Fortune)

Is Taco Bell right about the generation? What brand is killing it with Millennials, and what faux-pas are being committed? Is it ok to use young consumers' slang in a campaign? Ypulse Editor in Chief MaryLeigh Bliss visited Fortune Live to talk about the importance of appealing to young consumers, Millennial marketing mistakes, and the brands that are getting it right. (Ypulse)

Quote of the Day: “Anyone with natural beauty [inspires me the most when it comes to health and beauty]....everyday people more than celebrities or those with heavy makeup or fake bodies.” –Female, 32, NY

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