YAB Member Reports: Engaging with the Second Screen

Multi-tasking has taken over entertainment, and there is no turning back. We know that young viewers are more likely than not engaging with multiple screens simultaneously when relaxing– even while watching their favorite shows. This new form of engagement has turned Millennials into active participants when it comes to media engagement, instead of passive ones. Because of this, the second screen (or third, or fourth) can prove to be an opportunity for brands that take advantage of the multi-tasking viewer mindset by making multi-platform entertainment even more engaging than a single screen experience. Still, many questions remain– will young viewers willingly participate in the viewing apps, fan chats and enhanced content being made available to them? Also, how are young consumers actually engaging with the second screen entertainment flooding the market? Our 24-year-old YAB member Danielle gives us a glimpse at how second screen engagement is changing the way she watches and talks about TV. 

 

No remote? No problem.

With the help of our smartphones, laptops, and tablets, TV viewership has completely transformed. Now, we not only stream our favorite shows on-the-go from these devices, but we can also obtain instant feedback from people anywhere in the world who share similar taste in television. This second (or third, or fourth) screen has allowed us to engage instantaneously with friends, television networks, and social communities who share our television program preferences. 

Whether it’s a reality show, the Oscars, the Super Bowl, a POTUS press conference, or the season finale of Pretty Little Liars (which recently just became the first series in TV history to accumulate over 1 million total airtime tweets, according to the New York Post), the addition of multiple screens…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Political correctness is a two-way street of respect and telling the truth.”—Female, 17, WI

One teacher has declared war on homework. A note that has gone viral on Facebook and Reddit outlines a teacher’s new policy that homework will be limited to the work that students did not complete during the school day. They explain, “Research had been unable to prove that homework improves student performance, Rather, I ask that you spend your evenings doing things that are proven to correlate with student success. Eating dinner as a family, read together, play outside, and get your child to bed early.” Schools in Massachusetts have also adopted a “no homework” policy, signifying the start of a larger trend. (Mashable

Adidas is winning out with young consumers of all ages in China. According to RTG Consulting Group’s brand relevance report, Chinese Millennials and teens agree on similar brands as the most relevant in the apparel and footwear industry. Adidas came in first for both groups, for its products and social media strategy, and Zara, Uniqlo, and Nike followed. The least relevant fashion brand was H&M for Millennials, and Converse for teens. (Sourcing Journal

Game developer Blizzard is using the Broken Windows Theory—the idea that disorder breeds more disorder—in its war with cyber bullying. For its team-based shooter game Overwatch, Blizzard has implemented a chatbot to keep an eye out for negative phrases and turn them into “charming, self-effacing statements.” For example, “gg ez,” a commonly used phrase to let opponents know that victory was too easy, is automatically turned into phrases like "I'm wrestling with some insecurity issues in my life but thank you all for playing with me." The developer hopes that by hiding toxic behaviors, others won’t be encouraged to do the same. (Motherboard

Millennials are more likely than Boomers to marry someone with a different approach to finances. A recent TD Ameritrade survey asked respondents to categorize themselves as either savers or as spenders, and found that although more than half of Millennials and Boomers agree that savers being married to savers prevents financial disagreements in a marriage, 66% of Boomer savers are married to other savers, compared to 52% of Millennial savers. The younger generation is also more comfortable with it: only 23% of Millennial savers said they wouldn’t be happy with a spender, versus 40% of Boomers. (Investor’s Business Daily

According to Apple CEO Tim Cook, schools should be teaching coding as a second language. Computer programming been shown to help “kids see the world algorithmically, in patterns, and in cause and effect,” and some experts say coding education is crucial for kids to stay competitive. Although the youth of North America are well versed in Snapchat and YouTube language, one media theorist argues: "Unless kids understand how [the platforms they use] ­­are created…they're at a disadvantage to those who do know how to build and take apart these platforms." In the British Columbia province of Canada, students will soon be required to take coding from Grades 6-9. (CBC News)

Quote of the Day: “I follow the news because it’s there and I can't avoid it.”—Female, 28, ME

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