Why Denny’s Is #Winning Twitter

Today’s post is from Ypulse staffer Phil Savarese.

Last week, we spoke a little about how Denny’s mockingly jumped on the brandjacking bandwagon with a subtle yet funny tweet in response to the #mtvhack. That tweet was the tip of the Twitter iceberg: Denny’s has consistently been creating some great social media content and setting an example of how businesses should be interacting with their followers. In the spirit of the Serious Faux Pas series, we’ll take a look at how Denny’s is hitting their social media stride by not taking it all so seriously.

Denny’s has put its social media in the hands of ad agency Gotham Inc. Fast Company wrote: “Instead of its ‘social media best-practices strategy’—posting a formulaic mix of queued-up questions and product shots at scheduled times—it decided to play on Denny's atmosphere [and host conversations].” At the time of their brandjack tweet, twentysomething Gotham employee Arielle Calderon was in charge of tweeting on behalf of Denny’s. Millennials are digital natives fluent in the language of online communication. Given that the franchise is open 24 hours, Denny’s has been aggressively promoting late night dining for Millennials; and they know the best person to talk to twenty thousand twentysomethings on Twitter is a fellow twentysomething. Their followers certainly noticed the difference. For Denny’s, Twitter isn’t the place to get serious, it’s a place to have some fun. Here are some of the ways that Denny’s is #winning Twitter.

1. By staying playful on a personal level. Taking a look at Denny’s Twitter feed, many of their tweets are towards specific fans, responding to their posts about the restaurant. Others pose questions, and then later respond to the answers they get. Brands that are beginning to take advantage of the one-on-one…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“[Anna Victoria is] a good role model to women and is changing the way the world looks at fitness and body image.”—Female, 21, CA

Abercrombie & Fitch is going gender-neutral for their new kids’ clothing line. The “Everybody Collection” features “tops, bottoms, and accessories” for five-14-year-old boys and girls. A&F’s Brand President explained their decision to appeal to The Genreless Generation: "Parents and their kids don’t want to be confined to specific colors and styles, depending on whether shopping for a boy or a girl.'' The line of 25 new styles will be rolling out online and to 70 stores, starting this month. (Today)

Millennials & Gen Z already think the Nintendo Switch is cool, and now the brand is giving them more ways to use it. They’re introducing Nintendo Labo, “cardboard-based, interactive DIY experiences” for the Switch, tapping into the “toys-to-life” trend. The variety kit lets players construct five different “Toy-Con” experiences that include turning the Joy-Con controller into a motorbike handle complete with a throttle that can be twisted to accelerate, and creating a piano that senses which keys are pressed to produce the correct musical note. (Kidscreen)

YouTube is pulling Tide Pod Challenge videos from its platform. Teens started eating Tide pods when memes showcasing their Gusher-like colors went viral. The brand has since issued warnings not to eat the pods, and some stores have even begun locking up the product. YouTube has explained the decision to take down the popular pod-eating videos as a continuation of their policy to “prohibit content that’s intended to encourage dangerous activities that have an inherent risk of physical harm." Some are suggesting that pressure from parent company Procter & Gamble may have also been a factor. (Mashable)

The streaming wars are continuing, but audiences are turning to Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime for very different kinds of content. Hub Entertainment Research found original content is winning users' time on Netflix, while over half watch Hulu for its syndicated collection, and movies are most popular on Amazon Prime. The study also found that most Americans overall spend their entertainment time watching TV (40%), but 18-24-year-olds are most likely to engage with gaming and online video, like YouTube. (Quartz)

Outdoor Voices embraced Millennials’ minimal moment to break onto the athleisure scene. The brandless brand goes for a minimalist aesthetic with pops of color, and sees itself as an anti-Nike of sorts. The founder explains that they’re “a recreational Nike” because “With Nike and so many other brands, it’s really about being an expert, being the best. With OV, it’s about how you stay healthy—and happy.” Whatever they’re doing, it’s working: the company has grown rapidly since it was founded in 2013, climbing a startling 800% in 2016 alone. (Vogue)

“I saw some heartbreaking stories in the internet, and decided to look up some international charities and donate to them.”—Male, 20, WA

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