What Millennials & Gen Z Want to Do in 2017

What do young consumers have planned for the year ahead? We asked 1000 13-34-year-olds what milestones and life events they're hoping to accomplish in 2017...

We’ve looked back at the year behind us, and yesterday we laid out some of the big trends that brands should be aware of for 2017—but the most powerful force that could impact multiple brands are young consumers’ plans. More and more Millennials are tackling the major life milestones they’ve been known to avoid—from home ownership to starting a family. Home building company Toll Brothers reports seeing strong growth from Millennial buyers, stating that "with the Millennial generation now entering their thirties and forming families, we are starting to benefit from the desire for home ownership from the affluent leading edge of this huge demographic wave." Meanwhile, recently released data from the National Center for Health Statistics, revealed that 1.3 million 19-35-year-old women gave birth for the first time in 2015, bringing the total number of Millennial moms in the U.S. to more than 16 million. At the same time, the next generation is increasingly showing their influence, and approaching the end of their teen years. The plans that all of these young consumers have for the next year have the power to shift some major industries, so we asked 1000 13-34-year-old exactly what they’re hoping to do in 2017. Here’s what we learned: 

We should note that about 30% said they don’t plan to do any of these things this year—which means that roughly seven in ten have some sort of milestone in their sights for 2017. As we saw last year, many young consumers have their careers on their minds, and getting a new job is at the top of the list of their 2017 plans with almost three in ten saying they hope to get a new gig, and roughly one…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite brand on social media is Complex, because it's more of an online network that reports on urban culture.”

—Male, 23, MI

Luxury watch brands are innovating to cater to what could be their biggest opportunity: Generation Z. A September 2016 survey from Mintel found one in five 16-24-year-olds reported they were thinking of buying a watch “in the coming months,” and that “the young are the biggest buyers of all age groups.” As a result, watch brands are taking marketing online. Omega says that social media is not part of their marketing strategy but “the way [they] communicate.” (Financial Times)  

A group of moms is making hijabs for Barbie to battle Islamophobia. Created through a partnership with the non-profit For Good, Hello Hijab sells $6 handmade headscarves for dolls, available April 1st, along with a card explaining what the accessory is. As one founder explains, the aim is for a more inclusive generation: “They will see it as a kind memory from their playtime, and then they will grow into a kinder generation…used to playing with dolls that look different to them.” Profits from the new doll accessory will go to support multicultural communities. (RT)

Netflix is winning the “steaming wars”—at least on home TV sets. comScore’s analysis into video streamed over Wi-Fi to televisions in U.S. homes found Netflix’s penetration is around 40%, while YouTube, the next most-used service, was less than 30%. Both Amazon and Hulu are far behind at below 20%, but the latter was found to have engagement rates on par with Netflix: “People who do use [them] use [them] a lot…Both services engage their users for more than 25 hours a month.” (Recode)

Chipotle wants to "slyly” promote kids’ healthy food habits with an unbranded video series. RAD Lands, available for purchase on iTunes, follows “the Cultivators” as they try to save the galaxy’s animals and plants, and features cooking segments with celebrity chefs and musical appearances by the likes of Biz Markie and Wayne Coyne of the Flaming Lips. Described as an “entertainment Trojan horse,” the series is all about educating the next generation while also making a play to win back consumers after the brand’s food-related illness issue. (Ad Age

Airbnb is launching Aibiying, a new brand to target Chinese Millennials. The company’s research has shown an increase of 142% of travel out of China in 2016, and 80% of their users in the country are under 35. The young travelers are also a “lucrative market” according to one expert: "Chinese Millennials are likely to travel farther afield -- and to spend more while traveling—as their disposable incomes and appetite for adventure grow." Aibiying, which translates to "Welcome each other with love,” will include the brand’s latest “Trips” and “Experiences” features. (Inc.

Quote of the Day: “Budweiser ads are memorable because they pull at the heart strings with the horses and dogs.”—Female, 22, CA

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