Watches Are A Time-Less Accessory For Gen Y

WatchesIn today’s digital age, most Millennials look at their cellphone, computer, or other portable devices to know what time it is. So, many wonder, who needs a watch? Well, we're finding that watches are still quite popular among young people, just not necessarily for their primary purpose. Instead, Millennials are wearing watches as a fashion accessory to show off their personal style.

In a recent Pulse survey, we asked 317 Millennials how often, if at all, they wear a watch and nearly one-third (32%) said they always wear one or do so most of the time. Moreover, 2 in 10 (22%) say they wear a watch sometimes, reaffirming that there’s a large interest in watches with 71% saying they own one, even if they don’t wear it very frequently. We also discovered that a handful of Millennials own more than one watch, further illustrating that watches are a fashion item that can be swapped in and out depending on one’s outfit. As one 23-year-old female put it, “Watches have recently become my favorite accessory. I wear one every single day and I have found myself buying them in different styles and metals. I don’t mind investing in them because they are classic and won’t go out of style.” Further, while 68% of Millennials say they wear a watch to know what time it is, a close percentage (65%) say they wear a watch as a fashion accessory. Interestingly enough, guys wear watches more than girls (43% compared to 22%), which makes sense as it’s still a masculine way to accessorize and 45% of Millennials believe that accessories are important to achieving their overall outfit. Watches

When asked what brand(s) of watches they own, Fossil, Casio, and Timex came out on top. Fossil and Timex both make classic watches and Casio has long been a favorite among young people with its colorful and durable selection.…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I like shopping at Trader Joe’s, because it’s a fun alternative to the usual chain supermarkets to pick up specialty items that are tasty.”—Male, 33, MD

This year’s Olympics will be the most social yet—thanks to the digital generation. According to a study, Facebook will be the leading platform adults use converse during the event, but 35% of 18-24-year-olds and 19% of 25-34-year-olds plan to use Snapchat to share Olympic content. Compared to other age groups, Millennials will be two times more interested in human-interest stories and meme-worthy moments during the event. (Business Wire

Promposals aren't just a viral trend, they are now the most expensive prom cost for some. A study by Visa Inc. has found that an American household spends an average of $324 on promposing, and parents are increasingly footing the bill: In 2015, parents paid for up to 73% in of prom costs, up from 56% in 2014. Companies like The Heart Bandits are cashing in on the trend by charging upwards of $1000 to plan promposals, and brands are as well: Men’s Wearhouse Inc. declared March 11th promposal day on social media to sell tuxes for the occasion. (Bloomberg

Gap Inc. has launched a new athleisure line for children ages six to 14, bringing the high-fashion workout trend to the pre-teen set. Athleta Girl, an extension of the activewear brand Athleta, is categorized by activities like “run,” ”yoga and studio,” and “swim.” According to the fitness brand, the label was in demand: “A girls’ line is something our customers have been asking for. Girls today want to dress sporty. They are living more active lives.” Marketing and design for the line is leaning on girl power, with graphic tees showing off slogans like "Dream crazy big." (JezebelRacked)

As esports continues to grow, brands are figuring out to how to tap into the potential marketing goldmine. This year the global esports market will make $463 million, and will reportedly rake in $1.1 billion in 2019. Brands have begun sponsoring teams by adding their logos to players’ jerseys or hats, but they could potentially expand to leagues in the future. The key to effective branding will be “genuinely offering something new or valuable to the audience.” (VentureBeat)  

Can a brand create online influencers? In an approach that could be described as “reverse influencer marketing,” Mars is attempting to revive the classic candy bar 3 Musketeers with young consumers through a digital-only campaign featuring the “Musketeens”—three unknowns they want to turn into YouTube stars. The teens look and act like established YouTube influencers, and have been able to garner 400,000 video views. But the response has been split, with a large portion of users calling out the videos as annoying ads. (Digiday

Quote of the Day: “I consider luxury items as something that is nice to have, but that I can also live without.”—Female, 23, FL

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