Rewarding Fans Through Fame

Ben & Jerry'sIn today’s Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube obsessed culture, brands don’t just want to interact with consumers on social media, they want to create meaningful relationships with them. One way of doing this, which is quickly becoming the norm, is by leveraging fans to fame. Consumers are rewarded for their interactions and relationships with a brand by being placed on billboards, buses, in TV spots, and even by appearing in campaigns alongside celebrities!

Ben & Jerry’s for example recently took this approach in its “Capture Euphoria” campaign, where fans were challenged to Instagram pictures that embody euphoric moments. The winning pictures will be featured in Ben & Jerry’s ads in each person's hometown in print and on outdoor venues. Not only does this campaign tap into Millennial’s existing habits of using Instagram, but it also rewards them with local fame. Everyday people and their photography are celebrated, and the brand creates a bond with consumers.

Dunkin’ Donuts recently made its fans famous on a much larger scale through its “Top of the WorlDD” photo and video contest. Facebook fans were encouraged to share a photo or video of them wishing their family and friends a happy New Year and the winning ones were placed on a billboard in Times Square during New Year’s Eve. Through this approach, fans formed an emotional connection with the company and were made to feel on top of the world!

Skittles has long been a leader in this area, calling on fans to submit wacky pictures which reflect the Skittles brand or the company’s motto to taste the rainbow. Skittles rewards fans through fame each week with its “Greatest Fan in the World” feature on Facebook, a strategy that Dunkin' Donuts also uses. A fan’s name, crazy photo, and country are posted on the brand’s page,…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: "I want to be able to have, and provide for, a family in the next 3-4 years.” –Male, 20, NC

The gambling industry is (still) trying to figure out Millennials. While young travellers do seem to like Vegas, they’re not interested in playing slots, and more of their money and attention is going to technically non-gambling activities like fantasy sports. Some casinos are trying out skill-based machines that feel more like video games. According to the CEO of the Global Gaming Association “It's going to be a lot about throwing things up on the wall and seeing what sticks." (CNBC)

Digital natives have naturally integrated tech into their relationships, and teens are using texting and online flirting as a way of “dipping a toe in the ocean of romantic possibility.” But at the same time, in-person interactions remain important: 50% have flirted by friending someone on social media, while 55% have flirted by talking to their romantic interest in person. (The Atlantic)

Evidence that food is the new status symbol continues to mount. New research from Good Food magazine found that 16-24-year-olds in the UK spend more on food than any other age group, with much of that splurging spent on takeout. These young consumers are also spending more on brunch and other restaurant visits than older diners. (Vice Munchies)

Television has traditionally been relatively isolating, especially as an influx of content has made it less likely that everyone is watching the same show at the same time and time shifting has threatened the water cooler moment. But social media is making TV a communal experience again, as actors, writers, and the audience react to episodes in real time together. Social media activity is also an indication of a show’s popularity: Twitter and Nielsen have found that there is a connection between tweet volume and the size of the viewing audience. (NYTimes)

Exercise might seriously improve the mental health of bullied teens. A study from the University of Vermont found a 23% decrease in suicidal thoughts and attempts among bullied students who exercised four or more days a week. While the study doesn’t necessarily prove that exercise reduces sadness and suicidal tendencies, it is “an important first step” in connecting the two. (Common Health)

Quote of the Day: “I don't have kids, so my financial goal is to save the money I need to take the trips I want to take.” –Female, 25, FL

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