Unique Is The New Cool

Thrift StoreWhereas dressing like everyone else was once seen as the way to fit in, Millennials now have a mindset that celebrates individuality. To them, being original is important and they constantly want to curate their own style. Whether that’s through clothes, nail art, or hair trends, they aren’t afraid to stand out. In fact, they embrace it and want to experiment with their fashion. This is in part because Millennials are the most diverse generation and they’ve grown up being surrounded by differences. As a result, they don’t want to be limited to a uniform or logo; rather, they want their fashion to express their identity.

This sentiment is seen through their rejection of branded clothes. While Abercrombie logos were once cool, today, Millennials would rather mix and match pieces and create something new. Why replicate what everyone else is wearing when you can have more influence as an individual? According to Ypulse research among 1,200 13-34-year-olds, 55% say " I don’t follow trends; I like to think I have my own personal style."

Additionally, Millennials have a DIY attitude and are interested in making their own clothes or accessories. There’s a social currency in having a bracelet unlike any other or in telling the story behind an item that you made. Part of this mentality may be shaped by the economy, but we’re also seeing Gen Y place greater emphasis on creativity. One 21-year-old female recently echoed this idea: “I’m seeing the DIY trend everywhere with people making cool accessories, home décor, and clothes, which I think shows how creative my generation is.” Nearly a quarter (22%) of Millennials say they modify/cut up/or embellish their style. While this may not sound like a lot, it’s still noteworthy with upcycling becoming more common. 

Etsy and Modcloth have become…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Video game soundtracks have been present throughout my life.” –Male, 32, IN 

Snapchat says that 60% of American youth are users of their platform, and they have some major plans for the future. (Note: Ypulse’s most recent social media tracker actually found that 40% of 13-32-year-olds and 52% of 13-17-year-olds use the app.) Twenty-four-year-old CEO Evan Spiegel believes that teens and Millennials will make Snapchat the future of media, and mobile content will replace traditional TV. (The VergeBloomberg)

A recently discovered Google patent hints that the tech giant could one day create toys that can react to children’s voices, and record what they say. The digital/cuddly playthings could also physically respond to information with head tilts and different expressions. Some are calling the concept “creepy,” but our top toy trends of 2015 included several products that monitor and have conversations with children, including the new Hello Barbie. (Campaign)

The debate around cell phones in classrooms continues, and new research is weighing on the side of teachers and parents who want them banned. A working paper suggests that removing cell phones from schools results in an increase in academic performance, especially amongst the lowest-performing students. New York City Mayor DeBlasio recently lifted the cellphone ban in schools, in part because children were paying local adults to store their phones each day. (NYMag)

We’ve told brands about the importance of marketing on visual platforms, and those who do should take note: filtered photos are significantly more liked than #nofilter shots. A recent study found that filtered photos are 45% more likely to be commented on, and that people prefer high contrast, warm temperature filters. Filter judgment from more serious photographers is also fading as mobile has become the most ubiquitous picture-taking method. (Wired)

The Millennial Trains project is making its third voyage, carrying innovative members of the generation on a rail tour across the U.S. The participants are young entrepreneurs who share their ideas on how to change the world along the ride, which includes meetups, interviews, and other experiences to help them develop their concepts. This group includes a doctoral student studying nutritional programs for obese children, and a postdoc working on a project to keep the elderly more safe. (Fast Company)

We don’t just deliver data. Along with our monthly survey data, we provide our Gold subscribers with a topline report that synthesizes hand-picked, illuminating data points and our insights and expertise. Interesting differences between males and females, older and younger Millennials, ethnicities, and more are highlighted, and relevant statistics are streamlined into an easily consumed, concise, visual takeaway. (Ypulse)

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