Things You Should Know: Trending Sites of the Moment

In our quest to keep our finger on the pulse of all things youth culture, we come across a lot of unique sites and blogs that say a lot about the interests and tastes of Millennials right this minute. To pass that on to you, we’ve created a list of some recent talked about sites to give you a snapshot of Millennial culture. Here are some trending sites you should know:

 Rappers & Cereal

Sometimes a single-serving blog becomes popular just because it is so ridiculous you can’t look away. Rappers and Cereal just might be one of those blogs. The concept takes famous rappers and photoshops them endorsing fake cereals. For example, Snoop Dog poses with a box of Snoop Loops, and Macklemore holds a box of Mackle S’mores Crunch. The Tumblr has been going for about a year and is just gaining recognition, seeing a recent surge in popularity likely due to the insatiable appetite for cultural mash-ups that pair up two completely divergent categories. (The Game of Thrones and Seinfeld mashup videos are another great example of the trend.)


The 90s Button

If your question is: “Are Millennials ever going to get over ‘90s nostalgia?” The answer seems to be: not anytime soon. Despite their endless love for the ‘90s over the years seeping into marketing, influencing fashion, and dominating Buzzfeed lists, their appetite for everything ‘90s seems to have no end. Enter The 90s Button, a site that sends any visitor into an endless stream of ‘90s glory. The landing page features a Blingee background, three dancing MC Hammers, and a button featuring David Hasselhoff’s face asking, “Unleash Heaven?” Once pressed, a non-stop loop of ‘90s songs and their YouTube videos begins to play. Visitors can also share what song was served up to them with their friends, as each produces a unique URL. ‘90s…


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The Newsfeed

"I play [games] constantly until 4 in the morning. When I’m not on my game I’m checking my phone. And the whole time I’m doing all of that my desktop is on the internet.”—Male, 22, OH

Twitch is airing every episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, in celebration of the late Fred Rogers’ 90th birthday and the show’s 50th anniversary. The esports streaming service is expanding to nostalgia entertainment (which young viewers can’t get enough of), but they have a unique twist. The show will be available for co-viewing, with popular Twitch streamers chiming in from time to time. (Mashable)

Over one-third of 18-34-year-olds have stopped using a brand after hearing negative news about them, more than any other generation. Among the brands that most consumers said they gave up on were Wells Fargo, Target, Papa John’s, and Uber. However, Critical Mix and kNOW also found that young consumers are more willing to forgive a brand for bad press: While only 30% of consumers overall would use a brand again after a scandal, 41% of 25-34-year-olds would. (MediaPost)

Alamo Drafthouse is bringing back VHS—offering free rentals for Millennials that wax nostalgic for analog products. Their first store, Video Vortex, is opening in North Carolina. Not only are they “fostering a movie-loving community” with the extensive gratis collection of 75,000 titles, but they’re making money off of the added “beer, food, and merchandise.” No VHS player? No problem. They’re renting those as well. (BoingBoingEW)

Researchers were surprised to find Gen Z students were “relieved” to ditch their smartphones for a few weeks. Screen Education’s study of 62 12-16-year-olds found that 92% thought “it was beneficial” to disconnect from their smartphones while they were at camp. And even though 41% admitted they felt frustrated at times, 35% were able to cut down their use after camp and 17% convinced a friend to curb their time spent on smartphones, too. (PR Newswire)

Beauty brands love augmented reality, but an app can’t replace in-store experience. Not only did Ypulse found time and again that young consumers expect Experiencification and flock to marketing activations (like pop-ups), but brick-and-mortar locations build loyalty. People think they’re scamming Sephora when they re-do their makeup gratis, but that time-spent-in-store is really “turning the ‘scammers’ into buyers.” (Quartzy)

"I love my smart phone. It is just like my best friend [and] I just can't do without my smartphone...”—Male, 27, CA

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