Things You Should Know: The Video Game Online Series Edition

Today’s post comes from Ypulse Research Associate Phil Savarese.

 "Gamers" aren't only found in the confines of the games they play, gaming has become a lifestyle and entertainment genre all its own, and that lifestyle is rapidly being pushed into various forms of media. Earlier this month, we talked about the rise in popularity of online only web series, and the ones that you should be watching right now. Couple that trend with the recent explosion of video game-related content and you have an entirely new realm of entertainment.  We are seeing more and more web series cropping up with stories and content grounded in the gaming lifestyle; from commentary and analysis to scripted shows and hysterical shorts. Here are just a few of the gaming web-series that you should know: 


Day[9].tv and the Day[9] Daily

349,120 subscribers on YouTube & 108,737 subscribers on

In 2010, Sean Plott and Eric Berkhart, founded Jink.TV, a company dedicated to providing “smart, funny content on topics that matter to the serious gamer.” Their flagship series “The Day[9] Daily,” or D9D, airs twice a week on with archived episodes on and YouTube. Plott took a childhood hobby and created a career and a brand by beginning Day[9].tv. He was a nerdy kid from Kansas just a decade ago, and in 2011 was named one of Forbes’ top 30 under 30 for entertainment, placing him in the ranks of Millennial icons Jennifer Lawrence, Donald Glover, Lebron James, and Lena Dunham. Day[9].tv may not get millions of views per-video, but they operate perfectly within their niche by providing quality, scheduled content and fostering incredibly high viewer engagement. The discussion boards of the site operate during live streams of Day[9] programming, which gives the web-series a deep social…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I don’t plan to own a home in the future because it’s financially not possible. Too many student loans to pay back to ever make mortgage payments.” –Female, 21, TX

Teens already have plenty of tools to hide mobile communication from their parents, but now there’s another trick in their arsenal: BEEP is an app with an alert tone that only young people can hear. When users receive a message, the ringtone that sounds is a high frequency that most older people cannot hear and most teens can—which means that they could use their phones in places that they are usually banned. (iDigital)

In the last five years, the top 25 food and beverage companies have lost $18 billion in market share—and experts say Millennials and their desire for transparency are to blame. Lifeway Foods’ CEO explains, “’Millennials are driving a disruption in the food industry…I think we’ll see the food industry turned on its head.’” The trends they’re fueling include an awareness of ingredients, and a switch from low-fat to balanced diets. (Fortune)

In the ongoing online content wars, there are bound to be some struggles. Snapchat is rethinking their original content strategy, shutting down “Snap Channel,” its original video hub. But the decision isn’t necessarily a sign of failure: video content on the Discover feature from participating brands like BuzzFeed and ESPN has become a major source of revenue for the app, and “it’s possible that Snapchat decided it just wasn’t worth competing with the publishers.” (Quartz)

One in four children in the U.S. is underactive, while one in four children globally is malnourished. Now Target & UNICEF have teamed up to create a life saving kids’ wearable to tackle both issues. UNICEF Kid Power is a fitness wristband that allows child users to reach fitness goals. As they complete activities, they “'unlock’ life-saving therapeutic food packets” that UNICEF brings to needy families in developing countries. (Mashable)

Millennial consumers are attracted to innovative new brands, and are redefining luxury—so how does an established high-end brand appeal to them? Diane Von Furstenberg, who relaunched her brand in 1997, has embraced technology and new marketing content to reach a new generation of consumers. The designer tells Adweek, “One thing that is so exciting about this generation…is that all of them feel that they are a brand. So how do you talk to them if you are an established brand? It's all very interesting.” (Adweek)

Quote of the Day: “My current financial priority is saving up money to afford an engagement ring for my girlfriend, the subsequent wedding, and the eventual sperm vials/storage we will need to start a family of our own.” –Female, 27, WI

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