Things You Should Know: Silent Discos

Welcome to Things You Should Know, our ongoing series on Millennial-fueled trends, events, slang, and memes that will keep you up-to-date on what is happening in youth culture.

Imagine entering a concert venue flooded with neon lights, illuminating thousands of people energetically dancing and swaying… in silence. You have entered into the world of the Silent Disco, a music and event phenomenon that is enticing Millennials to tune in, by tuning out everything but the music.

The Silent Disco hinges on wireless headphone technology. On arrival, attendees are given headphones that utilize radio frequency transmission to broadcast sound through and around any physical objects, and allow partygoers to choose from two or three music channels that they can switch between whenever they like. As opposed to traditional speaker systems, headphones allow listeners maximum sound quality and intensify music events for a more personal experience.

These events bypass the restrictions of traditional concerts because of their silence. Silent Discos allow young adults to party all night long without the troubles of noise violations. The idea for silent concerts was originally conceived in the ‘90s by eco-activists to reduce noise disruption in outdoor spaces. What appeals to Millennials today ranges from rapid exposure to different music genres to vastly improved sound to the feel of a group experience that is poignantly customized. Everyone is dancing, but not necessarily to the same song, and the element of music choice makes each person’s experience unique. Silent Discos allow Millennials to literally dance to the beat of their own drum, engaging in a collective atmosphere while also tuning in for an experience that is all their own.

The popularity of Silent Discos has spread rapidly across…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “A wedding trend I’ve noticed recently is guests not dressing formally to the reception/wedding, more come as you are attitude.”—Female, 24, MI

This week, Mattel introduced an American Boy doll, their first male offering in the company’s 31-year history. New doll Logan Everett is part of a pair of singer-songwriters from Nashville who come with music-inspired accessories. The company reports that customers have been asking for a male doll for some time, and Mattel’s continuing strategy to diversify their offerings helped increase sales by 4% last year. (KidscreenNYTimes

Kids in Australia are spending more time online than watching TV. Research firm Roy Morgan reports that in 2016 six-13-year-olds spent an average of 12 hours a week online compared to 10.5 hours spent in front of the TV, the first time internet surpassed TV since the survey began in 2008. Online time has also almost doubled in the last eight years. The firm says, "The idea that TV is boring no matter what is on is just because TV is so static and it might have ads on it." (ABC

The current state of the White House has ignited Gen Z’s interest in politics—according to AwesomenessTV’s CEO, Brian Robbins. He reports that his own children’s newfound fascination with politics sparked by the recent election has inspired him to bring more political content to AwesomenessTV. Because “[a]n audience that really wasn't that interested is now really interested," the company will move away from “fluffy, horrible” entertainment news into political news, which could be in the form of documentaries, or scripted shows. (Business Insider)

Millennials are reporting higher rates of depression than any other generation, creating challenges at work. To avoid the stigma surrounding mental issues, young employees are increasingly resorting to using personal days to recuperate from anxiety, depression, and other afflictions. According to one expert, “this generation is not necessarily more depressed than workers of past generations, but more equipped to recognize it”—however, they fear judgement from their employers. (MarketWatch)  

Is Snap Inc. really a camera company? They say they are, and in their IPO filing the brand wrote, “In the way that the flashing cursor became the starting point for most products on desktop computers, we believe that the camera screen will be the starting point for most products on smartphones.” WeChat’s ability to read QR codes, Pinterest’s new visual search, and Facebook Messengers’ new visual capabilities all point to expanding capabilities of a camera—and the fact that “users’ experience of the world is increasingly mediated through cameras.” (The New Yorker)  

Quote of the Day: “I have a diamond wedding ring but any stone would be beautiful and appreciated.”—Female, 24, MN

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