Things You Should Know: Silent Discos

Welcome to Things You Should Know, our ongoing series on Millennial-fueled trends, events, slang, and memes that will keep you up-to-date on what is happening in youth culture.

Imagine entering a concert venue flooded with neon lights, illuminating thousands of people energetically dancing and swaying… in silence. You have entered into the world of the Silent Disco, a music and event phenomenon that is enticing Millennials to tune in, by tuning out everything but the music.

The Silent Disco hinges on wireless headphone technology. On arrival, attendees are given headphones that utilize radio frequency transmission to broadcast sound through and around any physical objects, and allow partygoers to choose from two or three music channels that they can switch between whenever they like. As opposed to traditional speaker systems, headphones allow listeners maximum sound quality and intensify music events for a more personal experience.

These events bypass the restrictions of traditional concerts because of their silence. Silent Discos allow young adults to party all night long without the troubles of noise violations. The idea for silent concerts was originally conceived in the ‘90s by eco-activists to reduce noise disruption in outdoor spaces. What appeals to Millennials today ranges from rapid exposure to different music genres to vastly improved sound to the feel of a group experience that is poignantly customized. Everyone is dancing, but not necessarily to the same song, and the element of music choice makes each person’s experience unique. Silent Discos allow Millennials to literally dance to the beat of their own drum, engaging in a collective atmosphere while also tuning in for an experience that is all their own.

The popularity of Silent Discos has spread rapidly across…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I am the one who buys random beauty products to recommend to friends if they are good.” –Male, 14, KN

Millennial travelers want the opposite of what their parents looked for in a hotel. Marriott International says that while Boomers “wanted familiarity, safety, and comfort," the next generation of travelers “want local and unique.” Global experiments in changing hotels to match their preferences have resulted in pop-up roof bars and locally sourced cheese-and-charcuterie restaurants. The brand predicts that Millennials could make up half of their guests by 2020—if they are able to appeal to them. (Fast Company)

Put your cookbooks away, younger consumers are bringing their devices into the kitchen. Think With Google and Kraft Foods' research revealed that 59% of 25-34-year-olds cook with their smartphones or tablets handy, while consumers over 35-years-old are more likely to print out a recipe. Search interest for “best recipes” on YouTube is reportedly up 48%, and “how to cook that” has become one of the top 10 most popular how-to searches on the site. (MediaPostDirect Marketing News)

The Apple Watch may not be Millennials’ cup of tech tea. A new study finds that “Millennials are dissatisfied with the Watch,” because the thrill of using it wears off after 30 days, and it feels like a “weak extension of their iPhone.” Others felt guilt over wearing the Watch because it seems ostentatious or frivolous. Not having a “killer app” could be another problem, though the initial reactions to the device aren’t necessarily an indication the Watch is doomed. (MSNCNBC)

Taco Bell says that understanding Millennials’ diversity and experience-driven mindset are the keys to being successful with the generation. Transitioning the brand from “Think Outside the Bun” to “Live Mas” is a part of their continued efforts to target younger consumers, who CEO Brian Niccol says see food as experience, not fuel. The chain strives to be “culturally relevant to the 25-year-old” because, “if you’re 40 you want to be 25, and if you’re 15 you want to be 25.” (Fortune)

Is Taco Bell right about the generation? What brand is killing it with Millennials, and what faux-pas are being committed? Is it ok to use young consumers' slang in a campaign? Ypulse Editor in Chief MaryLeigh Bliss visited Fortune Live to talk about the importance of appealing to young consumers, Millennial marketing mistakes, and the brands that are getting it right. (Ypulse)

Quote of the Day: “Anyone with natural beauty [inspires me the most when it comes to health and beauty]....everyday people more than celebrities or those with heavy makeup or fake bodies.” –Female, 32, NY

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